Beingness

Not sure that I can do this subject justice, but I do have some thoughts on it.

Feeling a sense of higher-purpose for living and imagining a future that draws you eagerly toward it are aspirations that we all share.

Some folks might even be certain that acquiring a good education and having strong career ambitions are one and the same as living purposefully and maintaining an optimistic outlook on future endeavors.

From my point of view now from having done both with education quote from Tolleand career, I know they are not the same as living purposefully and being excited about tomorrow’s unfolding.

I also know now that my present state of beingness is every bit as valid and important to my personal/spiritual evolution as any of the doings that I’ve done in my past, if not more so. Some recent reading material substantiates that belief.

There are two books that I’m slowly wading through, and both are like eating a 5-pound hamburger…you can only get through it by taking one bite at a time and allowing for digestion to do its thing.

One book is Eckhardt Tolle’s The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment; and the other is Dr. David power of nowR. Hawkins’ The EYE of the I, from Which Nothing Is Hidden.

Both authors are said to have achieved enlightenment or what we could refer to as an “enlightened state of consciousness.” And both describe what they experienced and intuited/learned through the mind-expanding experience and the subsequent mind-state following the initial ALL-ness connection.

I’ve certainly invested a lot of pencil-lead in both books; and essentially both say the same thing: It isn’t all the doingness that clears your path to wisdom and unity consciousness (which also equates to success and happiness for spiritual seekers).

It is the beingness—the allowing yourself to simply reconnect to the massive source of energy from which you came—the Source that provides all the answers you desire to every question you could ever conceive.

In other words, the path to enlightenment is NOT a doing path. It is a being path.

The doings that occupy so much of our precious lifetime are simply distractions from finding our true life-purpose and basking in that deep sense of inner happiness. No doubt you can learn a lot from doings, but only being takes you where you truly desire to reach for that sense of inner peace.

eye of II would provide a few appropriate quotes from each to substantiate this point, but Tolle’s entire book is on that very subject of the importance of simply Being; and Hawkins has some great quotes but focuses on tying all awareness into light frequencies and calibrating the consciousness levels between the general masses and the great avatars/teachers who reached that state of extreme expanded awareness. It’s a “numbers” thing with him.

Muscle testing for Hawkins was equivalent to finding the Holy Grail, and is the standard that he used to calibrate all acquired knowledge.5 lb burger challenge

Well, as I mentioned earlier, …lots of reading left to do in both books and I won’t be hungry for some time until after I’ve finished this 5-pound burger on my plate.

Honoring the Senses

This morning I saw the clouds approaching from the western horizon, but at that distance I couldn’t cloud bankdetect their speed. It really didn’t matter to me because I knew there were tasks to be completed today and endeavors to attempt. My mind had set its own agenda for this small window of “work opportunity” and was not going to be deterred by distant possibilities lying outside its “being productive” intention.

As I donned the clothes appropriate to the industrious labor awaiting me, I looked once more out the open window at the fast-advancing cloud front, and then caught the whiff of something distinct and easily recognizable—the scent of rain in the air. Now my wavering mind said, Hmmm, …maybe these work clothes won’t be needed after all.

It wasn’t long past that thought that the first “tinks” and plops” sounded as large rain drops hit the window glass and the AC unit housing beneath it—audio verification to what the visuals and olfactory senses had first alerted me: Yes, rain was on the way and some was now here.

rain puddleJust to be certain, stepping out the backdoor, I raised my palm to the sky and received yet another wet affirmation that the distant possibility preventing outside laboring had just become an actuality. My kinesthetic sense had made the final verdict loud and clear—yes, it was raining. (Yeah!)

My mind then released me from its industrious intentions—there would be no sense of guilt or shame at my outside inactivity when legitimate reasons (like it’s raining) had magically developed for me to now sit in front of my computer and write. One could even call it Divine Intervention if one wanted to stretch it a bit. And I did—I stretched it a lot. That’s why I’m sitting here now.

This morning’s rain event might seem a little mundane to even mention as a blog post, except I suddenly realized that the only human sensing device that I didn’t use this morning to determine my future actions was to stand outside with an open mouth to the sky and await a rain drop landing on my tongue—to taste it. That’s when it occurred to me what all was at play during this simple morning reassignment.

Our brain, the most amazing central processing unit (CPU) ever created, uses our individual sensing units to layers of braindecipher our surroundings, create mental intentions for our appropriate reactions to them, and then it sends electrical impulses out to our muscles for our physical responses.

Our minds have created extensive databases of information mainly based on our previous cause/effect actions that create desirable or undesirable consequences for us. The mind uses that behavioral pain/pleasure gauge continuously throughout each day and night to guide us in moment by moment responses.

Our memories, tinged with past emotional attachments to the situations that we have already faced, are the basis for that present-moment perspective filter we use to view the desirability or undesirability of each situation now before us.

brain 1The five senses and the emotions (which are both the energetic and the body chemistry reactions to whatever we encounter or perceive) alert the brain—and more accurately, alert the layers of the brain with their own individual functions and purposes to the overall CPU’s operation: from specific brain stem functions, to limbic functions, to cortex functions, and so on. There’s a lot going on up there that we take for granted until something doesn’t function as well as we hope that it would.

So when I first underplayed the importance of something as simple as a slight change in morning intentions or plans, I stopped myself in my tracks, and said, “Whoa, …look what really happened—look what my engirl in raintire body’s sensing devices told my mind for it to “let me off the hook” from doing that hard labor this morning. Maybe I should take just a moment to honor those sensing devices I’m so blessed to have and be glad that I’m not out there getting soaked to the skin—which I process as undesirable.”

There you have it—all this to say, “I wrote because it rained.”

To Pick a Raisin

“After walking out grapes on vinethe backdoor, Elizabeth ambled off to the grape patch and decided to sit there on the ground until she could pick a raisin from the vine. Knowing that it might take some time for the grape to completely dehydrate, she closed her eyes, straightened her spine and began to meditate.”

“WHAT?” our rational mind protests. “You can’t just wait there until a grape shrivels into a raisin. It could take days. She can’t sit in meditation for days! That’s illogical.”

But the subconscious mind understood the story as metaphor for delayed gratification and immediately got the message from it. Elizabeth knew what she wanted, was willing to wait for it, and considered the wait-time as soul-nourishing and acceptable. It isn’t meant as a literal interpretation of events; it’s a hypnosis device called an Ericksonian metaphor.

Just to be clear, this brief story isn’t about the “dreams deferred” of Langston Hughes’ classic poem “Harlem” or the amazing 1959 Broadway play by Lorraine Hansberry, called “A Raisin in the Sun.”

This story is about how metaphors, particularly Ericksonian metaphors, access that inner systems program that runs our life—which is our subconscious mind—the behind the scenes controller of almost everything we think and do—from how we perceive and interpret the world around us, to how we react to those perceptions, because sometimes we automatically think someone is referring to one thing, when they are instead talking about another.

I was actually providing my own childhood memory of walking out the backdoor, going over to the grapevine area between our backyard and the garden, and sitting down waiting for the then tart green grapes to ripen to sweet burgundy for eating. My grandmother had come over to me sittingrapes-or-raisinsg there and said I’d be waiting a long time for that to happen—like days; and I said I’d wait.

Of course I didn’t. Kids have no concept of time. But my grandmother also told me back then that if I waited there long enough, those grapes would miraculously change to raisins. I later learned that “miraculously” meant to dehydrate in the sun and shrivel on the vine. But miraculously sounded so much better.

Miraculous is how hypnosis works. I admit that hypnosis and NLP (neuro-linguistic programming) absolutely fascinate me. That’s why I’ve been trained in those techniques.

I’m fascinated with them because so much of our lives we believe the world around us to be one particular way, and seldom comprehend that the world around us is how we perceive it to be. It is our perception of the world that makes it the way that it appears. And our perception is very changeable.

In the last 9 paragraphs I have shown that how you perceive and decipher what is presentemilton ericksond to you can be easily manipulated and refocused toward a desired conclusion. That’s the beauty of Ericksonian metaphors: It’s like being driven around the countryside by your eccentric Aunt Betty, who after hours of wrong turns and harrowing near misses of both stationary and moving objects, she somehow manages to find her way back to your home just in time for dinner.

The desired effect is: early suggestion of delayed gratification, food references as rewards for patience, proposed childhood memories to trigger your own childhood memories substantiating suggested premises; and last effect is to refocus your mind on how your perception miraculously creates the world that you experience.

I mean, seriously, …Aunt Betty was just too erratic to drive anyone, including herself, but it’s strange how she always knew when it was time for dinner at our house. I’d call that Selective Craziness; and it worked for her.

The Relevance-Maker

I hate to end the year on downer subjects, so I’ll try not to. We all really need some lightness around the holidays for whatever reason that we do, and we definitely do this year. It’s been a rough year everywhere. We’re all feeling it—you are not alone in that “down-ward facing dog” pose you might be feeling right now.

Hence, the first thought that crossed my mind when this blank page popped onto my screen was a quote from an old cop-show that I’d probably seen for the 3rd or 4th time yesterday because the writing in it is clever. After figuring out a tough-case scenario, the main character quips with a smirk to his partner, “The mind is a relevance-making machine.”

Yes, it is!

For an old cop show that is a VERY profound statement, but that particular cop was always saying things like thCI Goldblumeat. He was the son of two psychiatrist parents, with himself once being a concert pianist who was now devoting his every waking moment to catching the “bad guys” in cases too tough for those standard detectives who are average folks, just like you and me.

That’s quite the story line—here’s a new breed of highly-educated cop with an out-of-the-box, in-depth perspective from childhood onward to why people do what they do. He then utilizes that cultivated knowledge (Why? What’s his ulterior reason to do so? They never say.) to know WHO committed the puzzling homicides, because this cop knows the perpetrator’s inner workings—their motivations, their weaknesses, their longings. He’s heard it—he’s seen it—he’s been there. No social strata can deter him. He sees through all economic determiners and all intelligence levels. All personas lie naked to his piercing gaze and psyche-infiltrating questions.

Is that scenario likely in real-life? No. But it’s good television. It’s a bit like the news now: Where fact comes up short for a 24-hour news cycle, add drama and speculation.

Relevance making is what we do every day of the world: We try to make sense of what is happening to us and all around us. We NEED to make sense of our world, so we look for relevance clues to tell us WHY things happen the way that they do.

Even when there is NO relevance to be found, we FIND it—we create it, because we NEED to know that the world has reasons and rules to live by. We follow rules and we expect others to do the same. We do this because we need to feel that our lives make sense and have a purpose, even when they may seem purposeless.

Even when the world seems to be crashing in around us, we need to know WHY it seems that way, because if there is NO sense to be made from it, then everything feels pointless—including our lives, our very existence.

But our minds will NOT let that happen—our minds will not let us feel pointless. So our internal information-filtrlid-on-frypan fireation system, takes bits and pieces of all the things that occur in our life, and it throws them all in a big bag then shakes the “coating” bag, and dumps the contents into the hot skillet to cook up a “reason” why this seemingly senseless thing might have happened.

After flipping that “reason” a couple times in the skillet over a hot flame, it looks more palatable, and we may become more likely to bite into it. Even if it isn’t very edible, we’ll likely chew on that “reason” for awhile trying to make sense of it.

But in some instances, what we are actually doing is trying to make sense of a senseless act, and trying to find relevance—something relatable to what is important to us—from the act.

Sometimes there is no relevance to be had or made in senseless acts. That’s simply what they are. Our relevance-maker can try all it wants to make sense of senselessness, but sometimes, the best relevance it can make is to acknowledge that sometimes things happen beyond our ability to comprehend—beyond our ability to understand.

So sometimes you simply have to “let go—and let God.” That’s the statement we often make when we surrender to a higher power and a greater intelligence than our own.

On some level, senseless acts likely do make sense. But on this level of awareness—where you and I exist, they may not. Sometimes that senselessness is a hard thing to swallow. So don’t even try to swallow it. Just spit it back out. It’s okay to do that.

Just say a prayer for those most directly affected by any act of senselessness wherever it might occur, and be thankful if you’re not one of them experiencing it; and then turn it all over to the Chief “Relevance-Maker” above our own, and simply let it all go.

In essence, that’s the only sensible thing that you can do. And the only relevance your mind can make from such senselessness is in the recognition that, yes, …it was senseless.

A Good Story

“Never let facts get in the way of a good story.”

(There is disagreement on who first coined that phrase, which makes my point here entirely.)

News media of all kind adhere to this “good story” theory of presenting news events dramatically because it draws viewership, which for them in turn means more money.

“Facts are facts,” …is another worn-out, too-often-used phrase. But the erroneousproblem with it is that those “facts” are interpreted by individuals just like all of us, who naturally have biased perspectives, and who sometimes have ulterior motives for proclaiming something as a “fact,” when it comes closer to simply being an opinion.

In essence, we are ALL this way to some degree—ALL biased and plagued by our own motives for just about everything we say and do. It is an aspect of the human condition. That’s how we learned to make sense of our lives and our world. We tended to believe that which substantiated our already determined view of the world around us, and discarded that which didn’t.

Even now, we may tend to see the world the way that we wish to see it, and believe it to be the way that we wish to believe that it is. Another person standing right beside us viewing the same “event” may not share our interpretation of what just happened or who was at fault during any serious incident witnessed by many.

Being the “unaffected observer” to life’s dramas is a rare stance to maintain; and it is not easily accomplished because of that natural human variance in perception and interpretation of what is occurring 24/7/365 to us personally, as well as all around us.

Our world is a collection of perpetual, individual interpretations of what is actually occurring at any given moment because people tend to see what they WANT to see, and to believe what they WANT to believe.

For every “witness” of ANY event, both good and bad, there will be personal motives involved in that “fact” interpretation—often motives that make us or our friends look more favorable in the story; and for all others, especially those who opposed us, to appear less favorable.

Whether this feels true or not to you, this is how most of us handle our world view. We tend to tell a story that makes us seem more acceptable to those whose opinions that we value. Sometimes we may unconsciously “alter” our story to make ourselves appear more favorable in the eyes of those whose opinions matter the most to us. What may have actually happened in any actual encounter will often be left unknown because of that human tendency.

So how do we as the audience to so many varied “event interpretations” make sense of what we see and hear on the media—which itself is a highly selective interpretation of events?

Unfortunately, it often comes down to the very same biases that might have plagued the witnesses of the original event: We see and hear the accounts of what we WANT to see and hear, and discard the rest as untruths.

We believe what we want to believe, because accepting something counter to our long-held belief system can radically disrupt our internal stability. It can shake us to our core. And that is not a pleasant thing to experience, so we strongly avoid it.

The proof has to be irrefutable for us to alter our internal beliefs about something important to us; and irrefutable proof is rare. It’s a bit like refuting the existence of Santa Claus on a grand scale: On some level of consciousness, who doesn’t want to believe a very stout guy in a bright red suit with reindeer on the side delivers parenting1presents to children all over the world on one short night?

Is it likely that this really occurs? But when you were a young, impressionable child, did you want to believe that it did? How did it make you feel when you first discovered that the “Santa Story” was a hoax, even though a well-meaning one?

That’s the power of personal beliefs: We tend to believe what we want to believe and discard any evidence proving the contrary. The truth of any event may exist on some level of awareness, but that doesn’t mean that we will ever know it, or even WANT to know it.

Truth may be truth, but how we perceive or receive that truth, is quite varied.

In Search of the Elusive Panacea

“Deep in the Amazon jungle, the intrepid explorers hacked their way through thick vegetation, endured sweltering and debilitating heat while trudging along writhing, parasite-infested trails, …all in search of the elusive Panacea.”

That darn Panacea. Hard thing to find, for sure.rainforest waterfall

First of all, where do you look? I mean, if no one has ever found it, where do you start your search? But wait, you might ponder, what IS a panacea?

Actually, that’s a very good starting point. A panacea is another name for cure-all, magic potion, or the solution to a problem.

Although some explorers have indeed found curative medical treatments derived from Amazonian flora and fauna, I don’t think the solution to all our personal, social and cultural problems lies in leech anticoagulants or “poison-dart frog” pain-killers.

I think that search has to be more of an internal one.

What I have noticed over the years of energy work, which includes REIKI, hypnosis, True-self Actualization, and just about anything else I do including my writing because it’s all energy work, is that most clients tend to think like their former medical professionals have trained them to think: You have a problem, you go to the Doctor, you get some pills, and one treatment should do the job—just get on with it and fix it quick—whatever their problem is.

Instead, what usually happens with clients is that we take care of some immediate energy imbalances and clear some blockages, maybe even make some interesting revelations on why they are where they are in life. I tell them what I’m intuiting about their situation from the feel of the energy they are holding and ask them some questions for them to later ponder that may spur deeper thought into the reason for their present problem.

I do this in hope that my clients will personally reflect on making some possible changes in their life to shift how that person is both perceiving their situations and reacting to them, because tainted perceptions and auto-reactions are key problem initiators, as is going against your own inner truth, especially when you know what that truth is.

But if the person then returns to life as usual, and doesn’t do the reflection and make the life adjustments in perception and reaction—or being true to who she or he is as a loving and compassionate person, then nothing really changes for them.

What I want to make completely clear to anyone is that there really is no such thing as a cure all—a one-trip solution to any problem, nor a magic potion that transforms someone’s life instantly and miraculously into exactly what that person wants it to be.

There are NO panaceas. That’s not the purpose of having a life on Earth.

Believing in life panaceas is like buying into the old “Snipe Hunts” of our youth: they don’t really exist. It’s just a ruse to get you out into the dark night with adolescent hormones running amuck.

Changing your life for the better takes a lot of reflection (meditation and journaling) and redirection (defining your goals and developing action plans to achieve them).

When you hear that “Life is a journey, not a destination,” there is truth and falseness to that claim. The truth is that over the course of your life you will try many things, attempt many relationships, and learn a lot about yourself and everyone around you. That’s the journey aspect—what you learn along the way.

The falseness of the statement is that Life actually IS a destination. You came here from higher-frequency spiritual dimensions to experience being alive in a human body and to amass greater comprehension and awareness during that brief process. You came to expand your consciousness. So, actually, your present life IS your destination this time around.

As for the elusive panacea to all your life’s problems, personal, social, and cultural, there is only one thing I can think of that might be considered close to it: Learning to love everyone, including yourself in all your imperfections, inadequacies and unfulfilled potential. We all have them. I think you’ll find that when you are happier with yourself, you can be happier with others.

So if there actually is an elusive one that exists—the one lone Snipe in the bush—then the only panacea that I know of, is LOVE.

BE the Peace

 “You can say it’s because of a global shift in consciousness, a destiny we have arrived at due to spiritual evolution, or the outcome of strange times, but, many people all across the globe are going through intense personal strangenss imagechanges and sensing an expansion of consciousness. Personal changes of this magnitude can be difficult to recognize and to understand” Christina Sarich

Art by Kathleen Farago

Yes, … “difficult to recognize and understand.” I saw this image and blurb on my Facebook page this morning, and since it definitely applies to what I’ve been recently writing; how we’re all going through this shake up and revamp now—just in our own ways, I thought I’d share it here with you.

Changes are happening all around us now and to us. We are evolving. We are adapting. We are shifting higher in consciousness, and it’s not an easy process, by any sense of the word.

But it is a necessary one.

For myself, I find that one of the hardest things to do daily is to hold my own center—to stay focused on my highest intentions to be at peace and stay there. I’m not always successful in doing that, but I make it my daily intention every morning.

So how can we stay at peace when the world around us is so chaotic?

Here are a few suggestions to help you find that safe-haven of inner calmness and serenity:

  1. Reduce or eliminate external sources of havoc and turmoil from your environment. That does not mean hiring a hit on your neighbor for his racket with cars, lawn mowers, leaf blowers, weed whackers, etc.. (Try a good set of headphones—they work wonders.) It means control what you CAN control: television, radio, who you hang with, who you talk to, where you go, what you do, …those types of things that are determined daily by YOU. You have control of those things.
  2. Get out in nature more. Take nature walks, sit on the Earth and meditate, enjoy the beautiful weather while it is still beautiful. Listen to the birds singing, and wind moving through the leaves in the trees above your head. Take a canoe or kayak onto a lake and just let the gentle ripples rock you like a mother rocks a newborn baby, so gently and lovingly. Feel held by the water or the earth. Feel more a part OF your environment—rather than apart from it.
  3. Develop an early morning meditation ritual. Set a regular time daily to simply get quiet inside. Be the peace you wish to see and feel in the world.
  4. Find physical outlets for your energy. Try walking or running, attend gyms or workout groups, but if your focus is on feeling more at peace within yourself, you might find that more isolated activities, where you aren’t sharing/balancing the energies of others in the process, makes it easier to hold your own center.
  5. Develop an ‘attitude of gratitude.’ A few years back, a lady popularized keeping a daily gratitude journal of all the things that she was grateful for in her life; and she found that in doing so, her entire perspective shifted from one of dread to joy. JOY is GOOD! Joy brings a sense of contentment and peace. We all need more joy in our lives.

Change is change. It just is. We are changing. Don’t let yourself be the end result of someone else’s anger or unhappiness.

BE the peace that you wish to see in the world. Hold your center frequency high, and stay there.