Transcending Archetypes

Jung book.jpgTranscending archetypes means changing or evolving through established patterns of behavior.

If you are not familiar with archetype theory check out psychologist Carl Jung’s work on it and Caroline Myss, the author, for her books Archetypes and Sacred Contracts.  (For Myss’s archetype list see this page: https://www.myss.com/free-resources/sacred-contracts-and-your-archetypes/appendix-a-gallery-of-archtypes/ .)myss arch book

What both have established is that as humans, we tend to follow set patterns of how we perceive ourselves in the world and likewise, how we act/react to that perception; i.e., that if you view yourself as a warrior then you are continually at war with anything that seems contrary to your opinion of how it should be. The example might be that if anyone should tell you a differing opinion of a particular situation, you will defend your own opinion to the point of doing battle over it.

The problem with warrior archetype is that you are continually at war over just about everything, because you are wired to defend at all costs—that’s how you see your role in life; and during extremely difficult times, warrior archetypes survive better than most others. So there are good reasons for being a warrior, but they mainly involve doing battle with others for some reason. The problem arises when warrior creates reasons to do battle, rather than looking for more peaceful modes of operation.

warrior.jpgOr if all you know is war, then what else is there for you?

So how does someone transcend an established way of viewing the world and an established pattern of behavior?

How does warrior stop viewing the world around him/her as something to conquer—a gladiator’s arena in which to pit oneself against all takers—where personal survival is the sole focus?

And likewise, how does victim archetype, (which is a passive, accepting or even inviting the aggression of others behavior pattern, often established to gain sympathy or favorsArchetypes circle 2.png from others more powerful) change to be a bit more warrior-esque to better defend herself?  How does s/he stop trying to covertly manipulate others, and overtly declare independence and autonomy from them?

It takes changing your mindset—changing how you perceive the world around you and changing how you normally react to the stimulus that you do perceive.

I think maturity helps—putting a few decades of experience under your belt; deciding that when you keep finding yourself in the same situations just with different players, and it always seems to result the same for you, that maybe it’s less about the other person being the problem and more about your own behaviors as the likely culprit.

In other words, you have to want to change the patterns of your life, and to do that you have to accurately assess what they are. For doing this assessment I would suggest Myss’s two books mentioned earlier. The have helped me to see my dominant patterns so I can at least attempt to tame myself when I recognize an ensuing encounter that might normally trigger my natural reaction, giving me a conscious choice to try another mode of reaction rather than my most likely one.male war.jpg

Example: I do rebel and warrior very easily. But I would prefer to operate more from sage and mediator. To shift my own life view for my mode of behavioral operation requires yodaan intentional intervention meant to produce a more desired result than the usual one I experience.  It means I have to define my reactions to others that I will allow myself to reveal, and to avoid those reactions that are not helpful to achieve my long-term goals.

Many times it means getting my head out of the immediate moment and putting it into the desired future result. If I can do that, then I can curb my natural tendencies and redirect them into more productive behaviors.  But it takes practice and strong intentions to make those changes in oneself.chart

If it is any consolation to anyone, transcending a no-longer-productive archetype seems to come more naturally with age. But the desire to do so must be present or it simply will not happen.

The Value of Skepticism

skepticSkeptics walk a rough road in this world. If you are one, you know what I’m referring to, and if you are a ready believer in much of what you see and hear around you, then you simply can’t understand the skeptic’s perspective.

To a skeptic, the fact that you, a believer, are so willing to “believe” everything you encounter, is an anathema to the skeptic’s view of life.believr cap.jpg

So which am I, skeptic or believer?

Not sure but I think I’m a bit of both because I can see genuine value in skepticism and yet I know that being distrustful of everything or forcing everyone to prove as verifiable truth what they are vehemently claiming to be such, is ludicrous in itself.

Take the concept of GOD for example. Prove to me GOD exists or prove to me S/He doesn’t. Prove to me GOD is even a She or a He, or both/neither.

There is evidence that something far greater than ourselves does exist—this I do believe—I am actually very spiritual and feel directly connected into that indescribable guy w glasses.jpgSOMETHING; and yet the likelihood that this SOMETHING is anthropomorphically or even anatomically similar to people in general is a bit of a stretch to me. So I have problems believing much of organized religion’s verbatim descriptions of a chief deity with human characteristics or failings.  That’s just a bridge too far.

However I am more likely to believe that people, historically ancient and even present day people, try to relate to the great mysteries of their lives in ways that make those doors of beliefmysteries more palatable or bite-sized for human comprehension because it is a natural way to better psychologically deal with emotional and physical hardships in general—a way to maintain a sense of hope for something better in the future if the present situation is pretty awful to endure.

I think that many people are natural “believers” because during the course of our lives we sometimes tell ourselves what we most want to hear just to make it through a painful situation. Sometimes we even believe what we most want to believe because not doing so is tightrope walking across the Grand Canyon of infinity without a safety net; …and who, other than a Wallenda, wants to do that?

So I do recognize that the older the civilization, the more ingrained the belief, especially skeptic truth.jpgif people feel that believing such has helped them to survive to their present state of being. I can easily understand that aspect of religious teaching acceptance by many.

Perhaps the church’s authority in people’s lives during their early childhood development in the last century instilled that sense of bowing to the head of a religious organization who told you how you could and could not live your lives.

But a few decades ago as horrifying as public exposure became of the wide-spread Catholic Priesthood child sex-abuse crimes, it did do one important thing: It shook a lot of natural believers away from giving people of authority total control over their lives, and also helped them to more skeptically view ANY high-ranking official of ANY organization, religious or secular, as all too humanly fractured to be the perfect vessel for any higher spiritual function.politican lies

Then again, you don’t need to be affiliated with religions to be a “believer” in something or someone, especially a someone who tells you exactly what you want to hear about the subject or about yourself, as it relates to the subject—like a politician.

I think political skepticism is very healthy and truly necessary in today’s world. Perhaps it always was necessary, but we just weren’t as aware of such widespread lying and intentional deception in earlier times because we were more naturally trusting of authority figures.

boy w woman.jpgSo there is value in skepticism—in not blindly trusting what we are being shown or told.

Skepticism helps us view our lives with more objectivity so we can see more than what we want to see, and to hear something closer to the truth than what we would actually prefer to hear.escape to reality

A skeptic’s view of life may not be the fantasy that we want to believe in, but it helps to keep things more REAL—and that is the world in which we actually have to live.

Treatise on Integrity

integrit paper.jpg“Integrity: That which shall be humanly borne and displayed as an essential aspect of truth.”

Well that’s my definition of integrity if no one else’s.

“To live with integrity is to be intimately aligned to one’s truth and core values.”

Again, that’s my take on it.

But I do know from personal experience that if you live your life with integrity and truthfulness, you will never be disappointed in yourself.

There will be others who might not be very happy with you at times, especially when your integrity blocks their intentions, but you will stay true to your own ideals if you maintain your sense of personal integrity and right-action focus.

So what does this mean in today’s integrity-starved world?

For one thing, you will definitely stand out from the crowd—you might even be the focal point of the crowd’s anger, which isn’t the most enjoyable place to be.integrit 2

For another, you will find yourself reaching very deep within for the strength and courage to keep your integrity untarnished amidst the constant deluge of complaints and insults slung in your direction.

Another possibility? You might lose a friend or two during the process of staying true to your own beliefs on the rightness of a situation or an action.

But the really strange thing about personal integrity is that nearly everyone believes that THEIR core beliefs and the courage of THEIR convictions are the only TRUE ones possible, which makes the rest of our efforts to maintain personal integrity questionable to them.

integrit 3As much as I value integrity and truth, and I definitely do value them, I also know that what I believe to be the ultimate TRUTH may not be the same as what others believe it to be. We don’t all think and feel the same.

Furthermore, in my rational mind I know that truth is often the perspective of whoever is holding that viewpoint.

But also in my being I know that what I stand for as a loving and compassionate human being is as strong and unwavering as any army’s professed allegiance to any person, place or belief.

Stubbornness is my finest trait or so I’ve been told, because to me integrity is a core value that is worthy of staking one’s integrit 1personal reputation on and/or career future. Holding one’s personal integrity firm and unbending can define us as compassionate human beings when others around us flutter in the winds of political change and collective opinion.

In the largest sense, our Nation was built on certain fundamental assumptions on rightness and fairness, on equity and justice; and when the integrity of any democratically elected official is in question or fluctuating toward non-democratic ideals, then further exposition and assessment of possible wrong-doing must be allowed to happen. The democracy that supports us depends on the integrity of those who lead it.

If we can’t at least rely on a leader’s integrity to do what is lawful and right as guaranteed to us by our U.S. constitution, then we have little firm ground on which to take a stand.

integ world

As I mentioned previously, maintaining one’s integrity is often a tough and lonely stance to take in the face of tumultuous, self-serving opposition, but sometimes it is the only stand we truly have before we are driven to our knees.

Contemplating the Year Ahead

I suppose if one were truly in THE MOMENT, then one would NOT be contemplating year change.jpgthe future or rehashing the past, but when it comes to this time of year it is hard not to give both some thought.

About now in my journal, I do a year-end-review to summarize all that occurred (good and not so much) throughout the year just passing. There are usually personal triumphs and losses that have been absorbed and evolved through—noting whatever knowledge was gained or wisdom acquired in the process of living life day by day, 365.

But at year’s end when I do this summation, it is easier to tell which lingering aspects are contemplationstill affecting me in some way. I always ask myself was 2016 a “good year” for me overall, or was it a constant challenge?

Each of us has our own opinion on the personally transformative aspects of this past year. Each of us was affected by events that were directly related to our own efforts, as well as being affected by events beyond our personal control. How we handled those two affectations was individually felt by everyone on many levels of our being: physically, mentally, and spiritually.

For me, I knew 2016 was a purging year—purging old memories, old associations, and old behaviors.

One purges physically to clear out the old toxins and disruptive agents affecting the body.

One purges mentally to clear the old trauma energies and stagnant thoughts from the mind.

One purges spiritually to clear the old, unhealthy beliefs about life and ourselves from our energy fields.refill.jpg

All this lengthy purging creates considerable disruption in our status quo/feelings of normalcy. But it also allows for completely emptying the old vessel to refill it with freshness and new experiences.

As we begin anew in 2017, I’m sure that we all hope the year ahead is one of joy and laughter, peace and prosperity.

However, we will take what it actually is as it slowly transpires before us.

I wish each of you all the best life can offer, and I hope that our collective-vessel refilling is with the highest frequency and purest energies of Divine Love and Light.

sunshiningMay we all shine like little suns and light whatever darkness that we may encounter throughout the days and weeks ahead of us.

Believe in yourselves. Believe in your natural abilities and resilience. And simply shine your light wherever you can.

BE PEACE to spread peace, because whether 2017 is a good year or not, is up to each of us.

Karma and Dharma

Bobbsey.jpeg

No, Karma and Dharma aren’t the Bobbsey Twins (Oh Lord,…how old am I?).

olsensHow about the Olsen twins—is that more relatable?

For those of us who wish we better understood the relationship between the two hard-to-comprehend Sanskrit terms, I ran across a good comparative description in a blog entry called “Understanding Karma and Dharma” by John Burgos at  https://www.beyondtheordinaryshow.com/spiritual-dictionary/karma-dharma/ .

In that posting, this subject matter is explained by him in a “makes sense” manner that had me nodding in agreement.

When I write about living your true life purpose—being authentic—living a purposeful life, etc., I am actually describing DHARMA—a Hindu concept attempting to put a label on living in the natural, harmonious flow of life. Proper labeling is not easily done in any language. But for all practical purposes to better understanding it, that is what DHARMA means.dharma k.jpg

In that posting, according to Burgos: “So when we speak about you living your dharma, we are referring to you living your truth, living your highest potential, and living in a way that is supported by the Divine in a manner that is in accordance to your soul’s desire.”

And when I write about facing/resolving our personal and collective karma, I’m in essence writing about the boomeranging reciprocity of any action’s intentions for lovingness or harmfulness to others. Or as Burgos explained it: “Karma, put simply, is the Buddhist and Hindu manifestation of cosmic justice. It is the conglomeration of all your actions or deeds, both good and bad, in this life or past lives, that determine your future.”

As Burgos explained, when the two major life processes actually come into alignment with each other, life is good.chart.png

We feel deeply at peace and are riding the Divine Flow of Universal Lovingness.

But when we are out of alignment with either or both life processes, our negative Karma can prevent fulfilling our true Dharma; and/or not recognizing and living our true Dharma can add to the blow-back-in-your-face effects of our bad Karma.

So how do you clean up this possible calamity before it reaches critical mass in your life?

He has a suggestion of a 5-Step Karmic Cleanse technique to keep us from falling5 step.jpg into the bottomless pit of our own ignorance, paraphrased by me as:

  • Think before you act,
  • When emotions/memories surface and you start to react to them, pause and breathe through it to simply release them from your being,
  • Forgiveness is key to mending disputes with others and within yourself,
  • Be kind—don’t be cruel—we know Elvis wouldn’t want that,
  • Share the goodness of your heart and soul with others—uplift others, don’t degrade or belittle them.

Overall, I think his posting is worth a read-through, and his suggestions are well-worth considering.

Namaste.

Accepting Hypocrisy

Many times when I feel the urge to write, I often put the first words going through my mind at the top of the page, and then just go from there. So after listening to the morning news where Evangelical leaders were defending themselves for supporting such flagrant bigotry and inflammatory racial-rhetoric in a presidential candidate, I wondered aloud how these supposed “Christian” leaders can so easily justify that incongruity between their TRUE BELIEFS/MORAL COMPASS and their political actions.

Under my breath I uttered, “Pure hypocrisy,” and then asked the broadly-smiling looking glass.jpgtelevision faces, “So how do you justify to yourselves that kind of hypocrisy?”

And that is why I wrote this title. Of course my mind immediately asked, “But why should we accept hypocrisy in ourselves or in others?”

The most accurate answer I could give is that we shouldn’t accept hypocrisy in ourselves or anyone else because to normalize and accept hypocrisy in ourselves is to live a false life, not an authentic one.

Somewhere in this mass of previous blog posts I know I’ve talked about what living an authentic life entails:

authentic self.jpg(July 21, 2016, “Creating a New Life Story”) “What I found amazingly with both Alberto and Tony, is that they were both talking about reclaiming your own power—by setting your true life goals—by defining who you really are and relearning how to live your life in an authentic manner.

Or in essence, both were defining the soul-nurturing importance of living an authentic life.”

The importance of authenticity means that deep within every individual, at the core of their being, lays a “soul resonator” that helps us determine when we are being true to our core beliefs or being false to them.

When you are being TRUE to your core beliefs, that Soul Resonator provides a feeling of inner peace and harmony with your decisions and actions that can help to support you in a difficult stand against injustice and intolerance.

But when you are being FALSE to your core belief your Soul Resonator will provide you with a gritty, fingernails-on-blackboard inner feeling that can make you physically shudder if the falsity is strong enough. It not only doesn’t support you in a false statement or action, it will undercut you to the point of initiating self-sabotage.eye of I.jpg

That Soul Resonator feeling is your body recognition of truth and falseness. Muscle testing is based on this premise that your body is your finest acknowledger of SOUL TRUTH. For muscle testing “truthiness” see this previous post: (Reference to July 19, 2015 on “Beingness” – Dr. David Hawkins book The EYE of the I, from Which Nothing Is Hidden)   ……(Both humorous and scary that I’ve become my own reference source.  🙂 )

Hypocrisy and authenticity are polar opposites—they cannot coexist.

compro truth.jpgYou can’t claim to be the standard-bearer of such Christian principles of love and acceptance, and still support racial profiling, religious intolerance, and assaults on basic human dignity. It’s not possible. Period.

So while those news-show “Evangelicals” are spouting their alignment to antithetical principles of the religion that they claim allegiance to and espouse to, all I can say is that they may have accepted their own hypocrisy, but I can’t accept it.

The Path—Why we need it, and how we choose it

As I mentioned in the previous reposting, a path.jpgdiscovering “The Path” for each of us is an important first step toward making the most of this precious lifetime.

It is important because The Path is the means to ‘be all you came to be’ before the world side-tracked you with all those distractions, enticements, and pit-falls that we associate with living a normal, socially-interconnected life. That maximizing your abilities to “be all you came to be” is often called self-actualization.

self-actualSelf-actualization means that a person not only discovers their hidden potential for maximizing their life, but it also means that the person made use of those innate abilities to manifest their pure-potential into actual creation to live their lives accordingly.

To be a fully self-actualized person means to know yourself so well that you are never surprised at what you do or why you do it because you know beforehand that whatever you do is what you are meant to do.  That gives you a tremendous sense of inner peace.

Finding the right path is often equated with feeling a strong sense of purpose for your existence in the here and now.

That is the importance of THE PATH—feeling that you have found your true purpose for living.  So whatever path you do choose must be the one that feels right to you and brings you a lasting sense of inner peace and satisfaction that you are living your life exactly as you were meant to do.buddha.jpg

That is WHY the path is so important.

HOW we choose it is often more difficult to determine. But as suggested in the previous repeated posting there are guidelines that help us find the right path for each of us:

  • Is it a path based on love and compassion for yourself, as well as for all others?
  • Is it a path that makes you feel happy about yourself and how you spend your time? (NO GUILT allowed on this path.)
  • Is it a path that nurtures you, and gives you a deeper sense of expansion and future possibilities in THIS world, not the next one?
  • Is it a path that allows you to grow and to BE who you truly are?
  • Is it a path of FREEDOM—or are you forever tied to the expectations of others?

Finding the right path for you means all the difference between living a purposeful, happy life or stumbling through your life always searching for greater meaning and a stronger sense of purpose for why you get out of bed each morning.

Your life’s context of why you greet each day must be as meaningful as your smile after recalling a hard day’s efforts as your head hits the pillow each night.

If you can satisfy your inner critic after a day’s labor of doing “your thing” in the world, then it’s likely you have discovered your true path.

terry quote.jpg

 

 

And that is a good place to be.