Live-stream Option for Dr. Joe Event

Again, just passing along the live-stream opportunity here.  Too bad it isn’t free. ($50)

As an energy worker myself, I am encouraged to see how well he explains the energy body and how our total system functions because we tend to think only of our physical body as the instigator of all our illnesses and maladies; but the energy body is the animator of our being and when those main chakra energy centers are blocked or damaged in some way, it throws our physical/mental/emotional systems into complete disarray.

I’ll list the promotion info for the event and then comment again afterwards:

Dr Joe Dispenza – OFFICIAL NEWS & FAN PAGE

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“An intentional thought needs an energizer, a catalyst— that energy is an elevated emotion. Heart and mind working together. Feelings and thoughts unified into a state of being. The quantum field doesn’t respond simply to our wishes—our emotional request. It doesn’t just respond to our aims— our thoughts. It only responds when those two are aligned or coherent— that is, when they are broadcasting the same signal. When we combined an elevated emotion with an open heart and conscious intention with clear thought, we signal the field to respond in amazing ways. The quantum field responds not to what we want; it responds to who we are being.

The quantum is the realm of infinite possibility. The only way you can experience this realm is with your awareness, and when you do, your consciousness is connecting to greater levels of frequencies and information.   Dr. Joe is giving you the opportunity of a lifetime to enter the quantum field as the collective consciousness of our community to create a new experience or new possibilities in your life.⁣⁣

You can join our upcoming live stream where Dr. Joe will be breaking down The Formula to change your life radically the live stream is taking place on July 27th at 10am pst (unlimited viewing for 30 days)  ($50 cost)  The main reason we are taking portions of our advanced retreats and turning them into a live stream format is that you, the community, have requested it.⁣⁣

Link in here to register and learn more! English, Spanish, French, German and Russian are all available https://linktr.ee/drjoedispenza

***

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(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1SL95sWIVJ4 )

I found this particular testimonial from his workshops was excellent in terms of how a woman worked through the energy release of healing her childhood sexual abuse.   It offers excellent explanations of the chakra energy centers releasing shame/guilt/terror energy blockages and then reopening and realigning the energy centers, and how that physically and emotionally affects us.  Joe explained it more thoroughly as she spoke including physical ramifications of blockages and reopenings.

But honestly I must say that the testimonial prior to that one did make me cringe (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IuvELXutkf0 )  with his hands-y approach to the young woman, and watching her facial discomfort with his wrapping around her from behind and his hand on her chest area (heart chakra location—heart, lungs, bronchial areas because she previously suffered from debilitating asthma).  I do think that was inappropriate and I will call him out on that.  I know what he was saying and doing energy-wise about using his own energetic heart opening behind her to encourage her heart to burst open, but still….the manner in which he demonstrated the heart-opening effect on her was highly inappropriate. And yes, that did adversely taint my opinion of his teaching techniques so we’ll see where it goes from here.

So form your own opinions on the content and benefits of what he is describing.

 

The Heart as Tuning Dial

What I’ve noticed lately is that whether or not I am in a good mood or a less-than-good mood depends solely on where I hold my thoughts.  As an energy practitioner, I know a number of ways to raise my frequency (my vibration) so that when life around me seems a little too distracting or even disheartening, I know that I have a choice in how I react to that initial feeling, and I have a choice in what I actually do about it.  First and foremost—every moment is a choice for us.

I want to stress this again: Every moment is a choice in how we respond to it.

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We can choose to simply accept whatever is negatively affecting us and drop into some grumpy funk, or we can choose to shift our own mood higher because we control our thoughts and our emotions.

While we tend to think of ourselves as passive receivers of life’s blessings and curses, what we don’t seem to understand is that much of what we are experiencing is because we are actively calling those like-resonating frequencies to us to address them in some way—whether to heal a long-buried, still-simmering, childhood resentment or to possibly heal a recurring and unpleasant interaction with another person that we keep trying to avoid—like family members or once-close friends.

Until we harmoniously address those still unresolved energy-dissonance issues, they will keep returning to us for yet another chance to do so.  (Remember, you don’t forgive the mistakes of others so that THEY can move on—you forgive them so YOU can move on with your life—otherwise those recurring disruptive energies are still taking up too much brain-space in your head.)

Sometimes these festering unpleasant thoughts that invade our minds and cloud our better intentions are externally triggered by forces we can’t foresee.  Right now for whatever reason, be it excess gamma radiation from the sun, or ancestral karma rising to the surface for proper release, or just everyone’s current state of undeniable craziness due to constant chaos in our world, all of us are experiencing  deep psychological tremors shaking within us that can make us question our mental stability. There’s lots of unpleasant “STUFF” rising to the surface now for re-examination and release.

And if you know exactly what I’m referring to, don’t despair. We’re all feeling it.

But what I most want you to know is that you do have a choice in the matter of how you allow those inner disruptions to affect you.

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As Nassim Haramein and Dr. Joe Dispenza both remind us here, you can change your personal vibration simply by focusing your thoughts and emotions to where you want them to be. And the more you hold the higher frequencies of love and compassion in your heart, the more likely you are to attract those very frequencies from others around you.  This isn’t woo-woo talking—it’s physics.  The frequency you hold in your energy field is what you attract—it’s called the Law of Attraction.

If your present thoughts are heavy with sadness or grief, then yes, please do examine the possible reason for those powerful, lower-frequency feelings, but then shift your thoughts to where you want them to be—to a happier time, to a loving moment, to a better tomorrow where your life feels good and you are supremely happy with lots of love and full support from your environment.

As odd as this sounds, lifting your thoughts to a higher place and bringing your emotions (heart-felt) to that same level of higher resonance (love frequency), naturally shifts your personal energy-field vibration higher and you attract more loving, like-vibration people and situations to you.

Try it for yourself.

***

Nassim Haramein

“A Visualization from Nassim Haramein: Consider your own body being made mostly of space. Close your eyes and experience the space that you’re made of and the space around you vibrating like a crystal. Then imagine that the rate of vibration of your biocrystal structure in the structure of the vacuum is equivalent to the information pouring in and out of you, in the same way that a crystal radio set tuned to a certain frequency allows you to hear a specific radio station. In the body, if the brain is the antennae of the radio set, the tuning dial is the heart, which defines the frequency of information received through the fluid dynamics rhythm of your body, and which can be altered by your emotional state.”

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Dr Joe Dispenza – OFFICIAL NEWS & FAN PAGE

 “When you embrace an emotion ahead of the actual experience in your environment, you’re signaling the gene ahead of the environment and your gene begins to change your protein expression, which means you’ve literally become the very person you want to be.”

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Be Yourself

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“Be yourself. Life is precious as it is. All the elements for your happiness are already here. There is no need to run, strive, search, or struggle. Just be. Just being in the moment in this place is the deepest practice of meditation.”

Thich Nhat Hanh

 

Before long the humble Buddhist monk, Thich Nhat Hahn, who lived much of his life in exile from his home country of Vietnam, will “transition” from this earth to the spirit plane.

He is 92 years-old now and has been revered by the western world for the last 53 years, since he left his war-torn country and began an extensive tour of the world outside his previously limited domain.

He suffered a severely debilitating stroke in November of 2014 and has been fairly silent ever since. It is reported that he has recently returned to his homeland for his eventual passing.thichbeyourselfquote.jpg

As a mindfulness teacher, Thich Nhat Hahn is credited with popularizing that particular meditation practice in the west—also credited with the “walking meditation” practice that he would demonstrate with his many followers at Plum Village in France.

Over the years I’ve read a few of his books and followed his shared thoughts. He always amazed me with his emotional calmness and unwavering sense of personal peace.

At this writing, he is still with us physically although his health is deteriorating, but he will always be with us in Spirit memory long after his body finally relinquishes this earthly life.

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2019 – Year of Beginnings

For this third day of January 2019, my post will be a mix of influences I’ve witnessed since January first.

Lee-Harrispicimage.jpgIt started with an energy update from Lee Harris on “2019 – Year of Beginnings” which I think is worth hearing, so I’ll list it here if anyone is interested:  https://www.leeharrisenergy.com/p/january-2019-energy-update

The gist of it from my notes was that this is the year of elevation (out of the mire of contentiousness and social dishevel).  2012 – 2019 was a 7-year cycle of clearing us energetically.  2019 – 2026 is a cycle of elevation – a brand new beginning bringing with it a lot of momentum and forward movement.  He says to create your personal change powerfully and purposefully. Live life more passionately.  Expect January to be more of the bubbling to the surface of major issues, but February is the beginning of the change—a vocal ‘stand up and speak your truth’ month. This is the time right now to be very clear on exactly what you DO want in your life, as that is what you will call to you now.  Speak your truth and stand up for what is right for all.

So then shortly after seeing the Lee Harris video, someone put through this gorgeous 49301924_2441835785844099_6951581753156829184_n.jpgsnowflake on Facebook that I found mesmerizing along with a quote from Einstein, one of my personal heroes.

“The basic laws of the universe are simple, but because our senses are limited, we can’t grasp them. There is a pattern in creation. If we look at this tree outside whose roots search beneath the pavement for water, or a flower which sends its sweet smell to the pollinating bees, or even our own selves and the inner forces that drive us to act, we can see that we all dance to a mysterious tune..”   Albert Einstein
snowflake photo by Kenneth Libbrecht

Quote source: How Einstein Saw the World
https://creativesystemsthinking.wordpress.com/2014/02/16/how-einstein-saw-the-world/

 

Then the next day “Tao and Zen” on Facebook added another D. T. Suzuki quote that I thought really explains how you incorporate that Zen  perspective into everything you do:

49511253_2446887465338931_7342677059904208896_n.jpg“The idea of Zen is to catch life as it flows. There is nothing extraordinary or mysterious about Zen. I raise my hand; I take a book from the other side of the desk; I hear the boys playing ball outside my window; I see the clouds blown away beyond the neighboring wood — in all these I am practicing Zen, I am living Zen. No wordy discussion is necessary, nor any explanation… When the sun rises the whole world dances with joy and everybody’s heart is filled with bliss. If Zen is at all conceivable, it must be taken hold of here.”   D.T. Suzuki

Zen & the Art of Living Deeply
https://creativesystemsthinking.wordpress.com/2016/05/15/zen-the-art-of-living-deeply/

***

In summary, to me as we start this new year together, I choose to view it as Lee Harris does—that it is a year of beginnings, so let’s stand up and speak our truth and choose our way forward with clear intentions and a strong sense of purpose.

Then as Einstein said, let’s recognize our interconnectedness and the Divine Plan behind our social, cultural, and even personal interactions occurring on this one living planet that we all share.

And lastly, as D.T. Suzuki said, “Be grateful for everything. Observe without judgment. Consume less, create more. Let go of fears and desires. Listen to understand not to respond. Be patient and generous. Love deeply.  Live simply.”

Here on this third day of January 2019, I think those are good personal goals to adopt.

Works for me.

Shoshin – The Beginner’s Mind

Sounds a bit paradoxical, but I can easily say that despite lessIknow45.pnghow much I’ve often thought that I knew throughout my life, or how hard-won that advanced knowledge came into being for me, the older I get the better I appreciate how little I actually DO know.

In truth it seems that with every passing day I feel this almost humorous certainty growing stronger within me: a certainty-of-my-own-ignorance—that jolting realization that what you once believed to be truth, actually wasn’t, and you may never know the REAL truth no matter how old or knowledgeable you become because that TRUTH exists in a realm that is incomprehensible to your present existence.

This body shock of awakening to our own innate ignorance can be scathingly honest and quite humbling.

It certainly was to my ego.

But to those who study Zen, this isn’t some new concept—some might simply call it ‘cultivating the Beginner’s Mind.’

What is Beginner’s Mind?  Here’s a good explanation first from Wikipedia, then from a Zen master himself.

Shoshin (初心) is a concept in Zen Buddhism meaning ‘beginner’s mind.’ It refers to having shozinbeginnersmind.pngan attitude of openness, eagerness, and lack of preconceptions when studying a subject, even when studying at an advanced level, just as a beginner in that subject would. The term is especially used in the study of Zen Buddhism and Japanese martial arts.”

Text source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin

Master Shunryu Suzuki can explain it far better than I can:

“People say that practicing Zen is difficult, but there is a misunderstanding as to why. It is not difficult because it is hard to sit in the cross‑legged position, or to attain enlightenment. It is difficult because it is hard to keep our mind pure and our practice pure in its fundamental sense.

In Japan we have the phrase shoshin, which means ‘beginner’s mind.’ The goal of practice is always to keep our beginner’s mind…

For Zen students the most important thing is not to be dualistic. Our ‘original mind’ includes everything within itself. It is always rich and sufficient within itself. You should not lose your self‑sufficient state of mind.

This does not mean a closed mind, but actually an empty mind and a ready mind. If your mind is empty, it is always ready for anything; it is open to everything. In the beginner’s mind there are many possibilities; in the expert’s mind there are few.

The most difficult thing is always to keep your beginner’s mind. There is no need to have a deep understanding of Zen. Even though you read much Zen literature, you must read each sentence with a fresh mind.

You should not say, ‘I know what Zen is,’ or ‘I have attained enlightenment.’ This is shoshinmaster.jpgalso the real secret of the arts: always be a beginner.

Be very, very careful about this point. If you start to practice zazen, you will begin to appreciate your beginner’s mind. It is the secret of Zen practice.”

Shunryu Suzuki
from Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind

 

So I acknowledge that here I sit in my own ignorance while trying to make sense of our life existence.

These are the very things I often write about: What is reality?—What is consciousness?—What are we doing here? Why are we here? Who benefits and how do they benefit from our incarnating here during this time period or ANY time period?

All those unanswerable questions come down to the battle in our minds over the relevance between our DOING and our BEING.

Here is a basic truth as I presently know it:  I AM.  I EXIST.  I EXPERIENCE.  I OBSERVE.

And I try like the dickens NOT to judge the value of what I am observing because to do so implies a comparative knowledgebase that I do not have—at least not from my humble human perspective.

the-older-i-get-the-less-i-know-by-that-i-mean-the-less-i-am-sure-of-i-view-p-403x403-nkb3nfSo each day I open my eyes and wonder what this day will bring to me. I wonder what new realization will occur to my sensing abilities. I wonder what type of sense I can make of whatever is happening to me and around me, but knowing full well that ‘making sense’ is a judgment in itself.

However, I also know that only through shoshinbeginner’s mind—can I simply observe all and note those observances without judgment or expectation—knowing I must simply allow all occurrences (and not labeling them as ‘good’ or ‘bad’) to flow along with the river of life into the great sea of consciousness that connects us all and patiently awaits our return.

This I also know:  Beginner’s Mind is not easily achieved nor sustained for long unless you willingly intend it.

Identifying Perimeters

leafcapillaries.jpgThis image fascinated me—the intricacies of the water dispersion system in the leaf itself.

Of course it wasn’t the first up-close view I’ve had of a leaf’s moisture-dispersal system, but it was the image that so clearly defined the leaf capillary perimeter that caught my eye.  Look closely at that perimeter.  What told the leaf to create that particular perimeter border and to stop spreading those veins outward into infinity?

Recognizing that leaf perimeter is so important because it actually defines the origin of the leaf— it represents the tree species that created the leaf.

See the next image to better understand that a leaf petreeidentifyshapes83.jpgrimeter is indicative of the plant’s DNA and the growing environment that produced it. 

And while there are many leaf shapes for all those multitudes of tree DNA, all have the same function on the tree.

“Function of leaves leafcotoosystem

 

The function of leaves is to help the plant produce food by converting the energy in sunlight into chemical energy that the plant can eat. Chlorophyll is the molecule in the structure of the leaves that takes the energy in sunlight to turn water and carbon dioxide gas into sugar and oxygen gas. This conversion process is known as photosynthesis.  The structures within the leaf convert the energy and make it possible for the plant to get food. … The leaf also has veins that can help to support the leaf by transporting food, water and minerals to the leaf and to the plant.”

So while I am mid-research into leaf function and leaf shapes, I find the shape that most matches the original image above showing the elaborate capillary system appears to be a leaf from the Bodhi tree.bodhitreewithleaves.jpg

Okay. What is significant about that? Well, to Buddhists the Bodhi tree is extremely significant because it was the location chosen by Siddhartha Guatama to meditate under until he reached enlightenment. He sat there supposedly for 49 days and endured unimaginable difficulties during the process before he transcended earthly existence and experienced the purity of Source itself; and was forever changed by it.

“Bodhi Tree – Fig Tree

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The Bodhi Tree, also known as Bo, “peepal tree”, or “arasa maram, was a large and ancient sacred fig tree located in Bodh Gaya, Bihar, India, under which Siddhartha Gautama, the spiritual teacher who became known as the Buddha, is said to have attained enlightenment or Bodhi. In religious iconography, the Bodhi Tree is recognizable by its heart-shaped leaves, which are usually prominently displayed.”  (Wikapedia)

So I’ve suddenly realized that my initial intention on writing about the intricate leaf structure and its defining perimeter has gone astray with educational sidebars.  Now I’m even into the tale of Buddha. Does this still pertain to my original intention of showing that a tree’s DNA defines the majesty of the tree’s stature/shape and the shape of its identifying leaves all while I miraculously segue into how our own DNA shapes the perimeter of our lives and defines us, only if we let it?

Well, maybe or maybe not.  It’s not the most direct route taken to a conclusion. But that’s part of the point here, I think.

We, as individual leaves growing outward from our Soul Source are defined to some extent by our DNA, by our ancestral history of nature and nurture, and by our karmic debts from all other lives. Our personal leaf perimeters are somewhat distinct and defined because of those factors mentioned. You even know which tree we grew from by our shapes and functional life success.

But at the same time, we have potential for unimaginable changefor breaking through our pre-defined perimeters.

Take the Buddha himself. He wanted to be enlightened so badly that he was willing to sit in meditation until he ceased to exist in this world or until he reached the Source of All Knowledge and Wisdom itself.  Fortunately for him and for the rest of us, he tapped into that Source and survived to share his experiences with the rest of us.

You don’t have to be religious to appreciate the enlightened mind or what it took/takes to reach that state of awareness. And some would argue that Buddhism isn’t actually a religion as much as it is simply a philosophical path toward enlightenment. That tangent is not my concern today.

It would appear that during this leaf examination I have spread my word capillaries far from original intentions and only reined them back with a fragile border of pertinence.

The only other thing I know for certain is that my Bodhi tree still awaits me.

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The River of Feelings

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“There is a river of feelings within us, and every drop of water in that river is a feeling. To observe our feelings, we sit on the bank of the river and identify each feeling as it flows by. It may be pleasant, unpleasant, or neutral. One feeling lasts for a while, and then another comes. Meditation is to be aware of each feeling. Recognize it, smile to it, look deeply into it, and embrace it with all our heart. If we continue to look deeply, we discover the true nature of that feeling, and we are no longer afraid, even of a painful feeling. We know we are more than our feelings, and we are able to embrace each feeling and take good care of it.”

– Thich Nhat Hanh
Photo: © Yvonne D. Williams

For some reason this Thich Nhat Hanh quote stuck in my head when I read it because I know what he is referring to—I’ve felt it myself—the stepping out of intense feeling, no matter how painful it may be, and simply watching it flow over us as we remain sitting on the bank in silence before the enormity of the water passing through on its journey elsewhere.

If you aren’t sitting a part from it on the bank, that “River of Feelings” is a flow we continually ride—sometimes in a kayak gliding above the water and sometimes in an inner-tube with half our body immersed into it.kayakriverswirl67.jpg

So for us to say that we do not “feel” something emotionally is to say that we are riding the kayak as we skim the waves while still feeling the froth of turbulence. We may bob around a bit with emotion, but we’ve elevated our heads above the water and as long as we remain upright, we know that we won’t drown.

Inversely, when we are immersed in the feeling, we become the feeling and may struggle for our lives; clinging tightly to our inner-tube to keep our heads above water—for fear it drowns us with wave after wave of intense, gut-clenching emotion.

tube on river67Grief is an inner-tube type feeling. So is rage. It’s easy to be swamped when you immerse yourself in those feelings.

Some would say depression is such a feeling, but I believe that depression isn’t really a feeling as much as it is the result of losing the inner-tube completely and accumulating body fatigue from continually treading water without relief in sight.

So what is the difference between riding the kayak and sitting on the bank?

The kayak provides an experiential option for riding the feelings we naturally have during the course of our lives. It gives us buoyancy and distance from the worst of the emotional waves sloshing about us.

The bank is an entirely different perspective on emotional impaction. From the bank you do not participate in the feeling, you only observe it as it comes and goes, and try not to judge its rightness or wrongness; its power or onriverbank45.jpgaffectation on you.  You acknowledge it as it impacts you and note what is being felt, but you let it go—you let it move on and away without clinging to it—without wallowing in it or calling it back to re-experience, over and over.

It’s not easy sitting on the bank and observing your own river of feelings; and sometimes it’s hard to even find a kayak from which to navigate the powerful river of emotions that we feel.  At times when life takes a tumultuous turn for us, we feel fortunate enough to simply have that inner-tube to help keep our heads above the overwhelming waves.

What I think Thick Nhat Hanh was saying in this quote is that observing from the bank (meditation) is the far safer option for dealing with intense feelings, because it allows the greatest perspective on the river of emotion itself that we must experience over the course of our lives.

As humans, we will have good days and bad ones—people will come to us and then leave us through disagreements, grievances or death.

During the course of our lives, we make efforts to achieve or acquire what we do not have, and those efforts are sometimes successful and sometimes not.

We love and we lose love.

We agree and disagree with others, and feel both great joy and great fear at many aspects of life, including our own mortality.

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But during the course of our lives, that river of feelings flows on and on, over familiar ground or new ground—but it keeps moving onward until we individually feel no more and merge again with the Great Ocean of Consciousness that logs “all feelings” as simply a part of the living experience.

So keep your inner-tube always handy, and find a kayak when you can do so to keep your head higher above the waves; but if possible, try instead the view from the bank for its safer, broader perspective, and simply allow that emotional river to flow on by without judgment or clinging.

I know—easier said than done—but it IS possible to do it. Trust me on this one.