On Being Unprovokable

Awhile back I was listening to some “Shift Vision 2020” segments and Shelly Covert bluemeditation.jpg(https://www.shellycovert.net/ ), Native American liaison and activist, was speaking on the state of the world in general. She said that she is usually unprovokable, but lately she was having trouble not reacting to everything she was seeing and hearing happening in her world—meaning in OUR world.

She said, “Trump is the reality check for our time period. You think you are an evolved, compassionate and loving human being?  Then how do you handle the daily insanity coming from the White House when it seems to be destroying every good aspect of our lives?

“Can you witness this without judgment? Can you evoke good intentions toward him and those around him when what you are actually feeling is rage and more homicidal tendencies? How can you stay centered in such a chaotic, daily environment?”

To me her simple statement and those following questions were uncannily accurate because I had felt that very thing that same morning after hearing the latest news show. I also was battling with myself NOT to react to what I had been witnessing on the news, when it filled me with such instant furor.

With some audible frustration in her voice, she said that for our own personal sanity and our sense of inner peace, we have to connect back into the larger energy matrix and get back into alliance with it to smooth out the ragged surface connections we are experiencing at present. We need to re-harmonize those disharmonious vibrations threatening our sense of inner peace and compassion for images.jpgothers.

To do this we have to extend our energetic connections beyond the dissonant surface matrix—to reach outward toward the true Source of ALL where Divine Love and Compassion reside—to go beyond the lunacy of this superficial existence to where Source itself, in all Its Divine Peacefulness, originates.

When we can connect back into our true energetic Source of life itself, then all personal disharmony vanishes, because Divine Source is far too powerful to be innerpeace6.jpgdisrupted by any minor surface static.

She said to be at peace, we must reach for the essence of peace itself and realign ourselves with that. I agree completely.

But I think it’s safe to say that being unprovokable is hard for even the most dedicated pacifists and meditators.

During the 1930’s-40’s, the Indian activist Mahatma Gandhi demonstrated what it really takes to shift power from governing oppressors back to the people of the land: It takes non-violent civil disobedience. Martin Luther King Jr. and many in the Civil Rights struggles of the 1960’s and 70’s (through the present) lived Gandhi’s example on bridges and in indomitablewill4.jpglunchrooms, on buses and in public gatherings around the nation—all with the intention of using the ability to remain unprovokable as an indelible mark in justice for all, and to revive incorruptibility in the American system of government.

I doubt that I personally will ever be unprovokable. I try. I do pull myself back when I feel like throwing things at the television, and simply remember that I’m the only one who controls ME, …so do it.

A little unsolicited advice for those who DO react to every daily, televised horror: Don’t let yourself be provoked or angered. Do something positive instead. Make a difference in some way—but make a positive difference. Shift the energy around you higher, not lower.

In battles with provokers, you only lose when you can be goaded into reacting to them.

So don’t be. Get smart—get organized—and get going. bethechange.jpgIf you want positive change—then make positive change happen.

And please start today!

Advertisements

The OPEN Mind

Limitation is so unnecessary.

open.jpgWhen we focus so tightly on a single issue or a single viewpoint, we limit ourselves and our outcomes.

You don’t need to do just “one thing” in your life when you can do many things. You needn’t “specialize” in a certain subject or a course of study unless you feel that “one thing” is the single guiding force of your life. Specialists in nature are often a rare, isolated species, and are the ones most prone to extinction because they limit their food sources.

While there are advantages to a tight mental focus, there are disadvantages to limiting your frame of reference so severely that you exclude other possibilities. When you zero in so tightly on a concept or even an ideology, you restrict any other explanation from penetrating your mind set.einstein quote.png

I don’t mean to be the judgmental finger-pointer here but in today’s world, being able to keep your mind OPEN to a problem’s solutions is an attribute, not a detriment.

Not only are we, the residents of this world we all share, still ignorant to the answers to all the world’s problems; we aren’t even aware of the best questions to ask pertaining to those problems.

That might sound critical of what is presently occurring in the world’s greatest problem spots, but world problem-solving depends on increasing your base knowledge of the issues, not restricting it; and single-point perspectives with limited options only create the same scenarios we’re trying to dig ourselves out from now.

Case in point: If you ever have the opportunity to go through Mediation Training please mediationtake it. Mediation is where a mediator helps two or more parties define their key problem issues; then she helps them to successfully resolve their problems in a mutually beneficial manner.  That training will help you realize how difficult it is to help two very different viewpoints find and accept common ground to build a better future outcome based on mutually beneficial goals.toddlers.jpg

It’s a lot like getting toddlers to share a slurpy even if they have two straws.

What you usually encounter in Mediation is that combatants are often like the two primary political parties mid-election year mayhem: There is the standard stalemate caused by “my way or the highway” thinking or the “you are so WRONG how could you ever be that stupid” viewpoint expressed by one or both participants in the mediation.

Emotion rules the disagreements, not rational thinking.

common groundBut the mediator’s goal is to find common ground between the two deadlocked camps, which means that if you are the mediator you have to dig deeper into each combatant’s wants/don’t wants to find out what the REAL issues are behind their immovable stances.

You’d be surprised what deeper wounds and hidden agendas are revealed in this process.

Sometimes the disagreement has nothing to do with the subject in question. The acrimony between the two camps is often pure, raw woundedness raging on whatever ground it can find to take its stand.  Those are tough situations to resolve amicably. A good mediator (not the same thing as a negotiator) earns every dollar s/he makes.

And the single most difficult task at hand for any mediator is to encourage the participants to come to the table with an OPEN mind—a mind willing to consider an option not previously proposed.

An OPEN mind recognizes that the “highway” is meant for two-way travel, and being “wrong” is often just a shift in perspective to being considered “not so wrong.”backyard.jpg

Common ground is the single unifier most sought by a good mediator. Once that is established then a mutually beneficial outcome can be defined for both parties. And once the emotional aspects of the arguments have dissipated, the warring parties are more willing to consider rational solutions to the dilemma.

But the key component to any problem resolution is that all participants must somehow achieve and maintain an OPEN mind state that is willing to simply consider ALL possibilities.kids.jpg

As dedicated as we are to our own viewpoints, stubbornness and intractability are less productive outside the nursery-school playground.