One Last Chance to Visit 3 Presenters from the “Understanding Narcissism” Summit

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Just saw the email from Tami Simons (Sounds True) on a last chance to hear Caroline Myss’s presentation that I wrote about earlier, ( https://content.soundstrue.com/understanding-narcissism-summit-encore?utm_source=bronto&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=C191116-UNS-Sell4&utm_content=Myss,+Hanson,+and+Neff+-+Free+Encore+Presentations&_bta_tid=09528543415476418810300132756200661561082200615837475413618082489837536028413298474285896175960726012765&_bta_c=azpcfyz2d505smzjcvmh15bka8yxt),  as well as two additional presenters, one of which I am reviewing here today.

This one is called “Healthy Confidence” by Rick Hanson, PhD.  Initially I didn’t understand (or appreciate) why Rick’s focus was on looking for a healthy approach to milder aspects of narcissism. So today when I listened again, I did so with the consideration that for some reason Tami and Jeffery thought that out of the 20 presenters listed, not only Caroline was offered again (which I easily 4dbb3d925440f266e9f3a71eaca87e9c.jpgunderstood), but also offered again for some reason was Rick Hanson’s presentation which to me represented the counter argument for considering mild forms of narcissism as building blocks for establishing a sense of solid self-esteem.

Then I listened more closely to what Rick was actually stressing here and he sounded very “Dr. Joe Dispenza” to me—more about healing yourself by holding the higher love-frequency emotions and using positive reinforcement to establish new patterns of brain function.  Then it made sense why he was offered as an encore. It was a positive presentation of helping others to help themselves in terms of self-worth.  Here are a few quotes:

“It’s about narcissism vs. self-worth—helping people develop (constructive) concepts of true self-worth to help those (more destructive) narcissistic tendencies fall away. Narcissists have a hollowness inside—an emptiness that they keep trying to fill with external recognition and a fair amount of self-preoccupation.  …”

He researched mother-toddler pairs and how those interactions created the solidity or lack-thereof in early childhood development.  “ …dismissive or indifferent early-childhood care-givers often created the void felt by infants that later led to excessive self-focused behaviors…”  It involved negative enforcement for undesirable infant behavior rather than a positive approach to desirable behaviors. … meaning, caregivers ignoring crying, disruptive behaviors, etc.

“It’s not abusive parental behavior, as it is simply a behavioral modification style that the parent believes is necessary and beneficial to the child and family in the long run, but which actually creates a feeling of unmet needs in the infant and child. … the child has yearnings for personal connection and love—to feel cared for and appreciated…these are normal human needs that are then met or unmet by the style of the caregiver. …

“Feelings of low worth and insecurity lead to self-preoccupation of feeling inadequate or insecure that push away the needs of other people in favor of fulfilling their own.  Overt narcissism is an endless pulling of social supplies from other people to fill that hole in the heart. …

“How do we grow healthy self-confidence? …How do we heal that old pain of never being good enough or adequate enough? … (Hungry ghost stuff). …

“Self-directed neuro-plasticity ….any kind of lasting change psychologically must be your-neurotransmitters-and-.jpgthrough lasting change physically. We become less demanding of others…we can be in relationships without making it all about ourselves. … especially create changes in the nervous system and the brain that make lasting learning… neurons that fire together wire together… help the experience leave a lasting physical experience behind to provide a memory that fuels our desirable behavior change.  …We become active agents of our own process of healing and transformation … Have the experience and enjoy it—really enjoy it—help those neurons form physical structures of brainwave patterns.  Stay with a positive experience for a few breaths to help it solidify in your brain. … somatic experiences—body sensations help us retain the benefits of the experience.  It is a rewarded feeling—we are being positively reinforced about our experience and it releases dopamine and serotonin in the brain.  Those ‘feel good’ chemicals released into our bloodstream that helps us feel good about ourselves.  …

“When we feel our worth, it represents something that we feel is true. We recognize it as a positive experience—we feel good about it. See it—feel it—internalize it. …

“Four major sources of self-worth (or self-confidence)—how you fill yourself up to feel good about yourself despite what others might think about you:

  • The 1st is to feel ‘cared about or caring’, …authentic experiences of warm-heartedness or altruistic love.index.jpg
  • 2nd is recognizing your own good qualities—natural talents, disciplined, hard-worker, perseverer, etc.
  • 3rd is experiencing and recognizing your true nature deep down—wakefulness, goodness, lovingness, Buddha-nature, childlike innocence, delight in existing, good wishes toward others, wishing to help others,
  • 4th is forgiving yourself, …self-compassion, healing shame, letting go of criticism, pardoning yourself but taking accurate responsibility for your actions and then moving forward in positive ways toward a better way of being.” ….

***

Jeffery: “How does this process soften narcissistic tendencies?” 

Rick:  “I’ve seen when people do this simple receiving practice of filling themselves with love and positive experience, they feel ‘more full’ inside, it lessens their craving for unmet needs, and tames craving of needing the opinions and acceptance of others.  They feel less a sense of deficit—of something missing because that person has then learned how to self-fulfill themselves with positive feelings of true self-worth. …”  

Jeffery:  “…so you don’t have to reduce narcissistic tendencies, you simply have to build a greater sense of true self-worth?”

Rick:  “With therapeutic help and cultivating a larger shift in perspective, it helps to regulate the ‘need factor’ of how we tend to use others for fulfilling own sense of worth.”

***

Okay. That is my quick-take of Rick Hanson’s presentation and his professional opinions as a practicing psychologist and a therapist, and to some degree I assume his techniques may be successful with those who have milder narcissistic tendencies, but with those who are severely narcissistic and primarily self-focused, I just can’t imagine that this treatment is truly and lastingly effective.  But again, that is just my opinion, and what do I know anyway. … 🙂

But I do agree with giving a child a healthy sense of self-worth, and in defining what the difference is between narcissism and actually creating a healthy sense of self-worth.

***

To that end I could more easily agree with Dr. Kristin Neff who was also offered on the page, on the ‘difference between self-esteem and self compassion’ and the importance of standing up for oneself against a malignant narcissist.

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Reality Is A Reflection of Beliefs

Upon seeing this, I loved the image first, but the subject matter “What is reality?” naturally caught my attention.  One of the key thoughts in this article by Anatasia Netri is this one: Reality is nothing more than a way of looking at things. Instead of focusing on creating circumstances which don’t change your reality, focus on shifting your perceptions, and watch your reality change.”

***

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“Why Reality Is A Reflection Of Your Beliefs – By Anastasia Netri

https://blog.sivanaspirit.com/sp-gn-what-is-reality-for-you/?fbclid=IwAR2VQ2mhB5wgWfYpOEkEzJA9ZZbT_rzUsGSFO_Vi9ypCSBXRag1n2VgmBlk

There are two people sitting on each end of a bench. Both people are hungry. At the exact same moment, a person walks up to each of them and hands them an apple.

This is the reality:

One person says “Wow, I was hungry and an apple appeared! Ah, the bounty of the universe. Geez, life really has my back. Thank you!”

The other person says, “All I get is this freakin’ apple? What happens in 10 minutes when I’m hungry again? I’m sick of being hungry. Life sucks.”

Reality isn’t your circumstances. Reality is how life feels to you. Circumstances don’t change that.

Often we hear things like, “Change your thoughts, change your life” or “Change from the inside out.” All these things are true.

We’ve confused reality with circumstances. However, reality is caused by our deep core beliefs about life. If we feel constantly that there’s never enough, and that’s way down in the subconscious, then no circumstance will ever make a dent in that. You can have money, food in the fridge, even some good relationships, but what you’ll feel most of the time is either that there’s still not enough, you’ll constantly worry about losing it, or you’ll even begin to sabotage these things without even realizing it to actually create circumstances that match your belief.

When you believe not-enoughness, what you want is to feel that enoughness and the peace that comes with it. So, you unknowingly look to create that from the outside in but it never satiates that desire for peace, no matter what you do. Reality changes when those limiting core beliefs are identified and examined because anything that’s not true will fall apart under examination.

Reality is a reflection of your beliefs.

Does your reality match what you say you believe?

If you want to change your reality, look at the current one. How does life feel to you? What tends to be your first reaction or response?

Are you trying to create outer circumstances that you think will change your reality?

For instance, If you feel unlovable, does someone else loving you change that on a deep level? If you feel unworthy, does hitting a goal or an accomplishment change that? Or do you feel like you’re just overcompensating? Worried? Stressed?

Begin with the truth. Begin right now, by taking a look at the current reality. Then, ask yourself what this current reality is showing you what you believe. To release false beliefs, they need to be identified.

There’s a wonderful quote by Carl Jung that says:

“Until you make the unconscious conscious, it will direct your life and you will call it fate.”

You’ll not only call it fate, but you’ll call it a reality.

A Course in Miracles defines a miracle as a shift in perception, so imagine this for a moment: imagine how different life would feel if you knew like you knew, like you KNEW that life was working out for you. It wasn’t an affirmation or something you needed to remind yourself of, it was just something you knew, like how you know gravity is real. You don’t have to remind yourself that you aren’t going to fly off into space, you just know it. You can relax about it.

When the core beliefs change, perceptions change, and then, you will live in a reality that feels much more peaceful.

Reality is nothing more than a way of looking at things. Instead of focusing on creating circumstances which don’t change your reality, focus on shifting your perceptions, and watch your reality change. “

 

The Beauty of Choice

Just talked to a close friend about her recent psychic reading from a woman she had never met and who had no idea about my friend’s life, history, family, etc. Sometimes those are the most accurate readings because the person doing the reading then has no tainted feelings about it one way or the other.

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My friend’s impression of the ‘reading’ was that the lady was fairly accurate in stating some basic facts, but in others ways the woman made some erroneous ‘interpretations’ on what she might have been seeing or intuiting during the session.  (We all filter the world we see through our own biases and personal histories.  Good psychics recognize their innate tendency to judge and proselytize with a client, so they restrain themselves.  Not-so-good ones will tell you their opinions, instead of simply relaying the facts presented to them.)

One of the statements the psychic made even claimed that prior to our incarnation, we make contracts with our closest relations to come here and “act in certain ways” with each other.  She then said, “So don’t be unhappy with your (family-person) for how that person acted, and what you or she had to endure during that person’s life here because it was all preordained to play out exactly as it did.  She couldn’t have been any other way.”

To that I say BULLSHIT

We may incarnate with a set family of mutually-agreed spirits who are here to evolve and grow their own consciousness through interactions with each other, as well as through interactions with those beyond the initial family group, but HOW we individually act throughout our lives is a choice that we make every minute of every day that we breathe this earthly air. That’s what ‘free-will’ is all about. We ALL have choices in what we do and how we do it.

Every moment that we are alive involves a choice in how we respond to our surroundings and to all external stimuli; and those choices are both personally affecting to our own soul’s evolution and mutually affecting to others in our selected family groups at the same time (even affecting to the greater collective consciousness).

To live our lives daily, we ALL make choices, and each choice leads to other choices that diverge from that first choice like a tree branch growing new twigs that reach in ekrquotechoices54.jpgdifferent directions as the branch continues to grow up toward the sky. When you choose one particular branch of that tree of life to follow, you are pretty much limiting your upward growth potential to that branch’s original direction, otherwise you have to backtrack all the way down the original tree branch to the trunk base to then choose a different branch to follow because in this life, you’re not a leaping squirrel and can jump from this main branch to another main one and expect your life to simply shift for the better because of it.  It takes real work to reverse an unwise original direction.

It is possible and well worthwhile to change unwise original directions, but it won’t be easily done because we all make choices daily from early childhood onwards, and every choice leads to more choices until a general life direction is established. Then as we get older personal attitude, natural tendencies to rely on established habit, and other motivations to either face down each new challenge before us or to give up and succumb to them by numbing ourselves out with booze or pills, become the determiners of how far up that particular branch you climb.

Those are ALL CHOICES that we willingly make—that is NOT predetermination.  Period.

Yes, there are extremely difficult situations that we may have experienced in this life that might be excellent learning opportunities in disguise, BUT it takes a pretty enlightened person to view them as such. Otherwise, we simply view them as they were originally presented to us—just awful and senseless living environments that were hard for us to endure back then, and even harder to make sense of now.

But even with those previous takingchargeofmylifechoicehardships and tests of personal endurance, we still face a choice in how we respond to those memory challenges.  As a child, you might have been the unwilling recipient of your parent’s momentary or long-term instability, but as an adult who is capable of better understanding human weaknesses or frailties, you NOW have the choice in how you view those situations, and more importantly—you have the CHOICE in how you presently react to or not-react to those unpleasant memories.

Your offending parent made numerous choices in his or her life, and those choices may have adversely affected you as an impressionable and vulnerable child. While you had few choices at the time to handle those difficult childhood situations, you have many choices now to deal with the residual memories and tainted attitudes that may still haunt you.

That is the beauty of choice: Every moment presents you with a new one.

Despite what that psychic erroneously told my friend, happiness isn’t something predetermined for you prior to this life.

Happiness is a choice you make and a path that you decide to follow.

 

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What Do You Want In Life?

It’s one of those days when Ionestrangerock234.jpg simply let the Universe present me with whatever I feel needs to be mentioned at this moment.  I was originally just going to highlight an outstanding National Geographic documentary on Netflix called One Strange Rock.

(See the trailer here: https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=one+strange+rock+netflix&view=detail&mid=B8CF815A849FCE482960B8CF815A849FCE482960&FORM=VIRE ).

It is narrated by Will Smith along with numerous astronauts whose perspectives on our beautiful, blue planet were drastically shifted once they were in space. Their insights are truly mind-blowing.

The cinematography is absolutely astounding in this series–you could watch it for that alone; and the astronaut’s explanations on the Earth’s interconnected ecosystems and biosphere may radically affect how you view the Earth as well.  Life is a question of balancecarefully controlled balance of all interacting ecosystems—from the long-traveling sands of the Sahara to the Amazon rain forest’s biodiversity to the living ocean’s diatoms to icy glaciers breaking off and falling back into the sea. Pretty amazing how this planet’s life sequence unfolds.

Then of course I open Facebook to today’s installation on philosophical thought from a few of my favorites and I had to mention their posts:

Dr Joe Dispenza – OFFICIAL NEWS & FAN PAGE

drjoewhatyouwantfromlifeWhat do you want in life? Take the time to answer the question.

As you begin to contemplate and think about the answer to the question, you’re changing your brain. When you make your brain fire in new sequences and new patterns and new combinations, that’s the beginning steps of changing your mind.

Decide on the emotions you’ll feel when you’ll begin to create that future. Teach your body emotionally what that future’s going to feel like. Don’t get up until you begin to feel those emotions. You have to decide what emotions no longer belong in your future. That means if you want to be wealthy, you can’t take lack. If you want to be healthy, you can’t take insecurity or fear. You got to begin to condition your body to a new mind. If you do this every single day, your personality creates your personal reality, and your personality is made of how you think, how you act, and how you feel.”  Dr. Joe Dispenza

***

Nassim Haramein

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“If the brain is the radio’s receiver then the heart is the dial tuning the radio to the frequency of your choice.” – Nassim Haramein

***

Earthschool Harmony

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“The touch of an infinite mystery passes over the trivial and the familiar, making it break out into ineffable music. The trees, the stars and the blue hills ache with a meaning which can never be uttered in words.”  ~ Rabindranath Tagore

 

When Is a Problem Really a Problem?

probdeinit453.jpgIn today’s world, the possible answer to that title question would be a “problem” for you is when you perceive the situation as a problem, otherwise the perplexing situation simply IS—it exists in front of you dependent on your personal interaction with it.  But that situation’s existence and your interaction with it may lie in some currently unknown context and you can’t presently make proper sense of it, so you may mistakenly perceive the immediate situation as A PROBLEM.

That is the danger of fragmented thinking. When we fail to consider the wholeness of the setting and situation’s context, and of ourselves interacting physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually within that environment, we limit ourselves to seeing only parts of the total scenario—fragments of the whole—and sometimes we see only the parts that we want to see or have trained ourselves to notice, while ignoring other pertinent information about the situation.

So perhaps our presently confusing life situation isn’t so much a genuine problem, as WE are labeling it a problem by not properly understanding the situation’s true context—we don’t understand our ROLE in this broader life drama.

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Confused yet?  Aren’t we all—that’s our biggest conundrum of this shared life experience.  We can’t seem to grasp the overall CONTEXT of why we are here interacting with each other in this crazy, erratic game of LIFE.

While that simplified explanation of a perceived problem and the context that it may ultimately exist in might sound like nonsense, it is actually describing a baby-step toward a more expansive way of viewing the world and reconsidering everything existing within it.

Here’s a video sample of a David Bohm’s explanation on What is the nature of reality?  taken from a 1990 physics and spirituality conference in Amsterdam.  (Notice the Dalai Lama sitting beside him.) [**“David Bohm (1917-1992) an American theoretical bohmanddalailamaconfphysicist who contributed innovative and unorthodox ideas to quantum theory, philosophy of mind, and neuropsychology, …”]

David Bohm speaks about Wholeness and (the dangers of) Fragmentation (fragmented thinking):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mDKB7GcHNac&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR0g1ZwJ8VvppoHq2_CCE8vhLrTPVwKs3v9AU9Jv2Um6xJGZ3hTVPN0-0R0

 “I think the difficulty is this fragmentation..  All thought is broken up into bits. Like this nation, this country, this industry, this profession and so on… And they can’t meet. That comes about because thought has developed traditionally in a way such that it claims not to be affecting anything but just telling you the way things are. Therefore, people cannot see that they are creating a problem and then apparently trying to solve itWholeness is an attitude or approach to the whole of life. If we can have a coherent approach to reality then reality will respond coherently to us..”      ~David Bohm,  Amsterdam, 1990

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**“…(Bohm) is widely considered to be one of the most significant theoretical physicists of the 20th century. In physics, Bohm advanced the view that the old Cartesian model of reality was limited, in the light of developments in quantum physics. He developed in detail a mathematical and physical theory of implicate and explicate order to complement it. Bohm warned of the dangers of rampant reason and technology, advocating instead the need for genuine supportive dialogue which he claimed could broaden and unify conflicting and troublesome divisions in the social world. In this, his epistemology mirrored his ontological viewpoint. He believed that the working of the brain, at the cellular level, obeyed the mathematics of some quantum effects. Therefore he postulated that thought was distributed and non-localised in the way that quantum entities do not readily fit into our conventional model of space and time (Wikipedia).”

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The Power of Story

Who doesn’t love a good story—a tale of mystery and inspiration?roaringfirecamplog.jpg

Well gather round the roaring fire my friends, and let us willingly partake of this storyteller’s narration:

“Long ago—long before there was written language, people gathered at night by their own camp fires for protection and warmth and to hear tales of bravery or to hear of fearsome encounters with all sorts of beasts.

Or maybe they gathered to hear of a far-away land of abundance and easy reaping of food sources that could get the family through from one day to the next, or from one week to the next; or to those who watched the changing sky at night, a place of such sufficient food supplies that the family could live from one full moon to the next because with limited resources available to them in more rugged and barren environments, there was no assurance that the family would survive for any length of time. Survival was the motivating force for everything the family did.

This was the sum of their life—everyday a constant focus on survival—simply staying alive and keeping those they cared most about, alive as well. Family member’s days were often filled with hunting wild game that they could catch and gathering any edible plants to share with their family group.   When two or more family groups gathered together for safety and shared hunting responsibilities, they became larger family units known as TRIBES.

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Often when larger tribal groups or clans were formed, a natural division of labor occurred among the people because some tribe members were more resourceful or more intelligent and/or made better hunters/providers than others did. Some tribe members were proven stronger and more powerful than others, and often larger groups were ruled by those who could hold leadership positions because of their physical prowess or intimidation abilities.

Women had many varied functions in small and large family groups; and since size and physical strength were often more male-dominated traits, it meant that women often held subservient positions to the males in the tribe unless it was a matriarchal society who valued the act of creation and giving birth to new tribe members.  Where wisdom, acquired through age and life experience, was more valued by the tribe, women were often considered the desired leaders.

When different family groups joined forces and first began communicating with each other, it required a commonly-understood language to describe the necessary workings of the situation and the environment—especially a means to signal danger or to communicate the need for cooperation to complete a group task, like for group hunting or defense strategies.caveartearlyhuman.jpg

With the development of a commonly-understood language among tribe members, came the glib-tongued tribal member who could best relay information around the nightly gathering at the campfire—the one who could relay the excitement of the day’s hunt or warn of approaching danger from other competing tribes, or speak of the possibility of better hunting if the group changed locations and simply followed the herds of animals as they migrated across the landscape.  Today we take common language for granted but it was once created for the purpose of basic survival.

The best-at-communicating tribal member was often designated as the tribe’s nighttime historian and/or storyteller—the one who could remember the tribe’s exploits and history of its members both existing and past. Storytellers relayed information to the others, but sometimes storytellers simply created their own stories for specific reasons, such as to fill the void of knowing WHY a particular thing happened when people couldn’t see valid reasons for what had occurred. Creating a ‘makes-sense’ reason eased group anxiety, and a less anxious group meant that people got along better with each other for longer periods of time, which meant less internal fighting.

Another important tribal member with specific functions was the healer/medicine woman or man, or sometimes that member was called the shaman—the one who earlymedicinemanshaman.jpgdealt with the unknown around them—talked to the animal spirits—communicated with the unseen spirits of the land and the sky.

If the shaman and the storyteller were one and the same person, then the fireside tales could become less historical focused and more philosophically oriented. This meant that “ORIGIN stories” were then created that described the reason for their life, death, and even the WHY of their existence because shamans can easily get information input from unseen forces—spirits in particular—possibly even from other intelligent beings since shamans had that 6th sense ability to communicate beyond the human realm.

Sometimes the shaman/storyteller created an entire set of beliefs on how the tribe members should live their lives, how they should focus their efforts to best appease the presently disgruntled nature spirits that had foiled their latest hunting effort; and sometimes the shaman even told the rest of the tribe what to aspire to or what to avoid for their personal best interest.

And sometimes the shaman just ‘made stuff up’ for their own personal reasons such as to gain a higher tribal status or personal favors from other tribe members.

The tribal leader—the chief—usually the strongman, bonshamanmongwas a powerful force in the group and often determined whether the tribe survived or became extinct, but the shaman/storyteller set the tone for their lives and often guided the members with tales of warning or tales of victory if all pulled together as one strong unit.

The most basic religions were started by shaman/storytellers—visionaries who claimed a connection to higher powers beyond earthly life, and who told their tales to others in such a convincing way, that the other tribe members believed them and then changed their own behavior to match that behavior prescribed by the shaman/storyteller who later became known to the tribe as the Holy Man/Holy Woman, or the Priest/Priestess.”

***

While it has certainly been proven over the eons of our human existence that stories have power over all who listen to them, stories are more easily believed by those who most need to hear their message.

Stories touch us in ways beyond our basic comprehension because they appeal to our inner vulnerabilities and to our innate desire to feel safe and secure.

Stories often speak best to our need to feel loved and protected—to feel a part of the larger group—to feel an integral member of the larger family to which we all belong.

The most powerful story that we always long to hear is the one that defines the purpose of our lives.

So maybe it’s time for a NEW ‘origin story’ so we can create that NEW life for the betterment of our human tribe.

I think that’s what I’m trying to do by gathering all these various information sources together in this eclectic blog. I think we need to recreate the HUMAN STORY.

And while it might not be easily done, I think this is something we ALL must do together for our personal betterment and for the survival of the greater tribe.

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THAT is the true POWER OF STORY

it defines our life.

 

 

 

On Wisdom, Compassion, and Mindfulness

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I don’t describe myself using any religious term like Buddhist, Christian, Muslim, Jewish, Hindu, Taoist, Gnostic, etc.  I am simply me, and I see the world through my own eyes and filter the world around me through my own senses using my personal, internal computing system in all its limitations.

Not aligning to a particular religious belief allows me unfettered consideration of how various religions tend to view the world and try to make sense of people’s lives. I find that some aspects of various religions seem to have a ring of TRUTH to them, but often their stringent rules and doctrines of required adherence for qualified “believers” of that particular religion, will quickly turn me off to it.

So I can stand here on the outskirts of all religions and simply admire what I like about certain ones. In truth I do like Buddhism for its psychological approach to the subject matter of why we are here and how we should be conducting our lives in non-judgmental full awareness of every moment.

And as I understand it standing on the outside, there are different forms of Buddhism, one of which is the Zen approach, which is appealing to me in many ways because its focus is on helping people to see life as it simply is and live your life from the purest form of moment-by-moment awareness.medalionfor peacereligions.jpg

I see the value in this approach to life just as I see value in certain aspects of other religions. What this condensed article is describing is pertinent to the human aspirations I most admire: Wisdom, Compassion and Mindfulness. And according to this author, that is the point of Zen.

But I also know that Zen is considered a fathomless concept, and none knew it better than D. T. Suzuki. So if anyone is truly interested in studying more about Zen, he would be a good starting point.

***

The quotes listed here are from the blog article: The Way of Zen – Wisdom, Compassion & Mindfulness  .    Posted on October 24, 2014 by Christopher Chase (https://creativesystemsthinking.wordpress.com/2014/10/24/the-way-of-zen-wisdom-compassion-mindfulness/?fbclid=IwAR1baYMA9UAfRnPJliTnIjB7QWR4GUQAegOKV126aTsQV_vwmLMV1pXMY5g)

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“Much has been written about Zen, but there are 3 essentials that are especially important. These insights and practices flow from the Buddha’s teachings yet can be applied by people of all religious faiths.

The first is the awakening of wisdom, what Buddha called right view. It’s coming to see the impermanence and empty “self” nature of all that exists. Seeing through the illusions of compartmentalized thinking to a more holistic understanding of how every atom, river, planet, galaxy and living being in our Universe arise together and flow as one interdependent ever-changing whole. …

The second is ethical conduct and compassion, valuing love and life more than material things, power or wealth. Supporting others, seeking to reduce violence and suffering, cultivating greater kindness and equality in society. Prioritizing peace, love and compassion is at the core of what many wise beings have shared with the world down through history. …

Finally, Zen teaches mindfulness of the present moment, observing what is happening without attachment or aversion. Being aware of what we are doing right here, right now, where ever we are. The practice of seated meditation is meant to assist with efforts to concentrate and calm the mind, but it is moment-to-moment mindfulness in all situations that Buddha most strongly emphasized. …

These three essentials taught by the Buddha: wisdom, compassion and mindfulness—are linked together synergistically and interdependently. When we successfully prioritize all three each serves to strengthen the development of the others. Over time (and with practice) we become more compassionate, wise, mindful, loving, joyful and at peace.    –Christopher Chase”

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