Vestigial Appendages

While reading a novel I ran across a humorous sentence—the main character was describing his boss’s mindset against treating others with basic human dignity.  “He viewed doing so as a vestigial appendage”—meaning it was similar to wisdom teeth and the appendix in human anatomy—an unnecessary present-day function and a left-over remnant from an vestigial.jpgancient time.

I chuckled at the reference, thinking it worthy enough of further consideration to have written it down on the napkin beside me. Those two words inspired memory flashes to my ninth grade Biology class—possibly a test question using that same mouthful, multi-syllabic, moniker for “the appendix” that I would eventually have removed forty years later.

In our current world, we deal with society’s vestigial respect dignityappendages all the time, but I wouldn’t call treating people with dignity and respect as one of them. Unfortunately in the last decade, our society has devolved into this particular mindset. We don’t respect others—we don’t respect differing opinions—and we don’t respect those who think differently than we do.

When a presidential candidate, and now The President of the United States, calls people that he wants to demean or diminish by childish, hurtful, disrespectful names, it lowers social mores in general to the level of street-slang and playground taunting.

Hearing a candidate for president doing so is disgusting, but hearing the chief representative of the American people doing it daily is appalling and unacceptable.

The problem, in my humble opinion, is that there are too many other adults who enjoy the childish nature of disrespecting others—too many people in our nation who like to put others down just to feel better than them—too many people who like to feel superior or separate from others for cliques.jpgone fleeting, delusional moment in time and alternate reality.

It’s like reliving junior high all over the nation—with mean-girl cliques and popularity trumping group camaraderie and compassion for all others.

Grow up people!  We are better than this!

Treating people with basic human dignity is NOT a vestigial appendage.

As the Senate now shows its take on the health care bill to the rest of us and many responsibilityviewing it aren’t surprised at the Medicaid cuts to people who need the most help, or the abundant tax cuts for those who need it the least, this situation is simply representative of a far deeper problem: How do we view ourselves in relation to all others around us?

Societies are only as strong as their treatment of the weakest among them. If some members of a society are considered expendable and not worth the rest of our time or expense, then how do you make the determination of where each of us rank in that same scenario?

hands of societyAre we already expendable now or perhaps will we be in another decade or two? Is there an age limit to caring about others? Are others too old, too young, too challenged, too needy, or just too much trouble?

When other people’s problems aren’t presently MY problems, how will I feel when suddenly life flips like it often does and I suddenly need help, and now MY problems aren’t something anyone else wants to deal with?

What we are seeing right now are the warning shots of a aree to respect.jpgGreat Society in peril of losing its sense of humanity—of losing its premise of basic human rights and dignities—of losing compassion for others, or failing to recognize that by one nasty twist of fate, you or I could be on the wrong end of someone else’s refusal for social responsibility.

This is a certainty: That social pendulum has to swing back to center soon or it is just a matter of time before we ALL will be considered vestigial appendages—easily removed from public consideration by a surgical slice—or the slash of a pen.

Do you want to find yourself on the operating table this year or maybe the next?

I know I don’t.strong together.jpg

Treatise on Integrity

integrit paper.jpg“Integrity: That which shall be humanly borne and displayed as an essential aspect of truth.”

Well that’s my definition of integrity if no one else’s.

“To live with integrity is to be intimately aligned to one’s truth and core values.”

Again, that’s my take on it.

But I do know from personal experience that if you live your life with integrity and truthfulness, you will never be disappointed in yourself.

There will be others who might not be very happy with you at times, especially when your integrity blocks their intentions, but you will stay true to your own ideals if you maintain your sense of personal integrity and right-action focus.

So what does this mean in today’s integrity-starved world?

For one thing, you will definitely stand out from the crowd—you might even be the focal point of the crowd’s anger, which isn’t the most enjoyable place to be.integrit 2

For another, you will find yourself reaching very deep within for the strength and courage to keep your integrity untarnished amidst the constant deluge of complaints and insults slung in your direction.

Another possibility? You might lose a friend or two during the process of staying true to your own beliefs on the rightness of a situation or an action.

But the really strange thing about personal integrity is that nearly everyone believes that THEIR core beliefs and the courage of THEIR convictions are the only TRUE ones possible, which makes the rest of our efforts to maintain personal integrity questionable to them.

integrit 3As much as I value integrity and truth, and I definitely do value them, I also know that what I believe to be the ultimate TRUTH may not be the same as what others believe it to be. We don’t all think and feel the same.

Furthermore, in my rational mind I know that truth is often the perspective of whoever is holding that viewpoint.

But also in my being I know that what I stand for as a loving and compassionate human being is as strong and unwavering as any army’s professed allegiance to any person, place or belief.

Stubbornness is my finest trait or so I’ve been told, because to me integrity is a core value that is worthy of staking one’s integrit 1personal reputation on and/or career future. Holding one’s personal integrity firm and unbending can define us as compassionate human beings when others around us flutter in the winds of political change and collective opinion.

In the largest sense, our Nation was built on certain fundamental assumptions on rightness and fairness, on equity and justice; and when the integrity of any democratically elected official is in question or fluctuating toward non-democratic ideals, then further exposition and assessment of possible wrong-doing must be allowed to happen. The democracy that supports us depends on the integrity of those who lead it.

If we can’t at least rely on a leader’s integrity to do what is lawful and right as guaranteed to us by our U.S. constitution, then we have little firm ground on which to take a stand.

integ world

As I mentioned previously, maintaining one’s integrity is often a tough and lonely stance to take in the face of tumultuous, self-serving opposition, but sometimes it is the only stand we truly have before we are driven to our knees.

Faith and Belief

rocks.jpgThere are things I have faith in, and things I believe, if only at this moment in time.

There are people I feel comfortable with, and those I avoid for reasons both known and unknown to me; unknown because some “intuitive discomforts” are hard to put into words by the rational mind.

So as an energy worker I would simply say that some people’s cocooning energy vibration does not resonate with my own surrounding energy field, and leave it at that.heart split.jpg But in truth, those are the people that I would avoid because in their presence their vibrational dissonance is so pronounced that I simply cannot stand to be in their energy for long.

There are also people who believe things that are considered to be religious doctrines within their particular FAITH’s creed that lay out the do’s and don’ts for all of us—the should’s and should not’s, the “thou shalt this” and “shalt not do that’s.”

There are even religious doctrines that define the reason for our existence as the whim of a jealous God, and state that our continued progress forward depends only on following the very narrow path that religion prescribes; as no other path will suffice for our salvation, whatever salvation means to that belief.

Tbooks rel.jpghere are faiths that spout hatred and intolerance as the way to achieve heavenly bliss in the hereafter, which makes little sense to anyone other than believers of that faith.

But the fact is, there are people who DO believe these things: the DO’s and DON’Ts, the jealous God, the only path forward, along with holding tightly within one’s being the toxic, dissonant energies of intolerance and hate.

I can honestly say that I believe many things. But foremost I believe that HATRED begats only hatred (love that stupid word “begats”—probably because it is SO officially Biblical).

But I also have FAITH that LOVE is, and will always be, triumphant over hatred not because of a single man, however Divinely connected he may have been; but because of our collective end-game goal of “heavenly bliss” which cannot be reached by any other vibrational frequency than LOVE, which only makes hate doctrines the surest way to avoid such a possible state of future blissfulness.

You can call whatever you wish the particular philosophy that you stake your existence on.

I really don’t care.mlk-quot

For myself, I believe in Love and in holding a high-vibrational, blissful focus every day of our lives as the solution to our present inner turmoil, as well as the peaceful guide for our external actions.

But I don’t have to convince anyone else of that belief, especially when it is so easily experienced for one’s self.

I know this to be a fact: HATE will eat you alive, while LOVE will set you free.

I have FAITH in LOVE.  I BELIEVE in LOVE.

FAITH and BELIEF do not exist between the covers or a book, or the walls of a steepled structure.

They are your personal connection to your very reason for being if you only take the quiet time to feel them for yourself.

Contemplating the Year Ahead

I suppose if one were truly in THE MOMENT, then one would NOT be contemplating year change.jpgthe future or rehashing the past, but when it comes to this time of year it is hard not to give both some thought.

About now in my journal, I do a year-end-review to summarize all that occurred (good and not so much) throughout the year just passing. There are usually personal triumphs and losses that have been absorbed and evolved through—noting whatever knowledge was gained or wisdom acquired in the process of living life day by day, 365.

But at year’s end when I do this summation, it is easier to tell which lingering aspects are contemplationstill affecting me in some way. I always ask myself was 2016 a “good year” for me overall, or was it a constant challenge?

Each of us has our own opinion on the personally transformative aspects of this past year. Each of us was affected by events that were directly related to our own efforts, as well as being affected by events beyond our personal control. How we handled those two affectations was individually felt by everyone on many levels of our being: physically, mentally, and spiritually.

For me, I knew 2016 was a purging year—purging old memories, old associations, and old behaviors.

One purges physically to clear out the old toxins and disruptive agents affecting the body.

One purges mentally to clear the old trauma energies and stagnant thoughts from the mind.

One purges spiritually to clear the old, unhealthy beliefs about life and ourselves from our energy fields.refill.jpg

All this lengthy purging creates considerable disruption in our status quo/feelings of normalcy. But it also allows for completely emptying the old vessel to refill it with freshness and new experiences.

As we begin anew in 2017, I’m sure that we all hope the year ahead is one of joy and laughter, peace and prosperity.

However, we will take what it actually is as it slowly transpires before us.

I wish each of you all the best life can offer, and I hope that our collective-vessel refilling is with the highest frequency and purest energies of Divine Love and Light.

sunshiningMay we all shine like little suns and light whatever darkness that we may encounter throughout the days and weeks ahead of us.

Believe in yourselves. Believe in your natural abilities and resilience. And simply shine your light wherever you can.

BE PEACE to spread peace, because whether 2017 is a good year or not, is up to each of us.

Karma and Dharma

Bobbsey.jpeg

No, Karma and Dharma aren’t the Bobbsey Twins (Oh Lord,…how old am I?).

olsensHow about the Olsen twins—is that more relatable?

For those of us who wish we better understood the relationship between the two hard-to-comprehend Sanskrit terms, I ran across a good comparative description in a blog entry called “Understanding Karma and Dharma” by John Burgos at  https://www.beyondtheordinaryshow.com/spiritual-dictionary/karma-dharma/ .

In that posting, this subject matter is explained by him in a “makes sense” manner that had me nodding in agreement.

When I write about living your true life purpose—being authentic—living a purposeful life, etc., I am actually describing DHARMA—a Hindu concept attempting to put a label on living in the natural, harmonious flow of life. Proper labeling is not easily done in any language. But for all practical purposes to better understanding it, that is what DHARMA means.dharma k.jpg

In that posting, according to Burgos: “So when we speak about you living your dharma, we are referring to you living your truth, living your highest potential, and living in a way that is supported by the Divine in a manner that is in accordance to your soul’s desire.”

And when I write about facing/resolving our personal and collective karma, I’m in essence writing about the boomeranging reciprocity of any action’s intentions for lovingness or harmfulness to others. Or as Burgos explained it: “Karma, put simply, is the Buddhist and Hindu manifestation of cosmic justice. It is the conglomeration of all your actions or deeds, both good and bad, in this life or past lives, that determine your future.”

As Burgos explained, when the two major life processes actually come into alignment with each other, life is good.chart.png

We feel deeply at peace and are riding the Divine Flow of Universal Lovingness.

But when we are out of alignment with either or both life processes, our negative Karma can prevent fulfilling our true Dharma; and/or not recognizing and living our true Dharma can add to the blow-back-in-your-face effects of our bad Karma.

So how do you clean up this possible calamity before it reaches critical mass in your life?

He has a suggestion of a 5-Step Karmic Cleanse technique to keep us from falling5 step.jpg into the bottomless pit of our own ignorance, paraphrased by me as:

  • Think before you act,
  • When emotions/memories surface and you start to react to them, pause and breathe through it to simply release them from your being,
  • Forgiveness is key to mending disputes with others and within yourself,
  • Be kind—don’t be cruel—we know Elvis wouldn’t want that,
  • Share the goodness of your heart and soul with others—uplift others, don’t degrade or belittle them.

Overall, I think his posting is worth a read-through, and his suggestions are well-worth considering.

Namaste.

Accepting Hypocrisy

Many times when I feel the urge to write, I often put the first words going through my mind at the top of the page, and then just go from there. So after listening to the morning news where Evangelical leaders were defending themselves for supporting such flagrant bigotry and inflammatory racial-rhetoric in a presidential candidate, I wondered aloud how these supposed “Christian” leaders can so easily justify that incongruity between their TRUE BELIEFS/MORAL COMPASS and their political actions.

Under my breath I uttered, “Pure hypocrisy,” and then asked the broadly-smiling looking glass.jpgtelevision faces, “So how do you justify to yourselves that kind of hypocrisy?”

And that is why I wrote this title. Of course my mind immediately asked, “But why should we accept hypocrisy in ourselves or in others?”

The most accurate answer I could give is that we shouldn’t accept hypocrisy in ourselves or anyone else because to normalize and accept hypocrisy in ourselves is to live a false life, not an authentic one.

Somewhere in this mass of previous blog posts I know I’ve talked about what living an authentic life entails:

authentic self.jpg(July 21, 2016, “Creating a New Life Story”) “What I found amazingly with both Alberto and Tony, is that they were both talking about reclaiming your own power—by setting your true life goals—by defining who you really are and relearning how to live your life in an authentic manner.

Or in essence, both were defining the soul-nurturing importance of living an authentic life.”

The importance of authenticity means that deep within every individual, at the core of their being, lays a “soul resonator” that helps us determine when we are being true to our core beliefs or being false to them.

When you are being TRUE to your core beliefs, that Soul Resonator provides a feeling of inner peace and harmony with your decisions and actions that can help to support you in a difficult stand against injustice and intolerance.

But when you are being FALSE to your core belief your Soul Resonator will provide you with a gritty, fingernails-on-blackboard inner feeling that can make you physically shudder if the falsity is strong enough. It not only doesn’t support you in a false statement or action, it will undercut you to the point of initiating self-sabotage.eye of I.jpg

That Soul Resonator feeling is your body recognition of truth and falseness. Muscle testing is based on this premise that your body is your finest acknowledger of SOUL TRUTH. For muscle testing “truthiness” see this previous post: (Reference to July 19, 2015 on “Beingness” – Dr. David Hawkins book The EYE of the I, from Which Nothing Is Hidden)   ……(Both humorous and scary that I’ve become my own reference source.  🙂 )

Hypocrisy and authenticity are polar opposites—they cannot coexist.

compro truth.jpgYou can’t claim to be the standard-bearer of such Christian principles of love and acceptance, and still support racial profiling, religious intolerance, and assaults on basic human dignity. It’s not possible. Period.

So while those news-show “Evangelicals” are spouting their alignment to antithetical principles of the religion that they claim allegiance to and espouse to, all I can say is that they may have accepted their own hypocrisy, but I can’t accept it.

The Path of NO-Path

My life, and all of ours if we are attentive, is humorously synchronistic where I am constantly reminded to never take myself too seriously.  This morning the Universe presented me with numerous addendums to my previous post—all of which came through some fine “focal points.”

focal point.jpg

“You are not IN the universe, you ARE the universe, an intrinsic part of it. Ultimately you are not a person, but a focal point where the universe is becoming conscious of itself..” ~Eckhart Tolle

 

***

Ramana quote.jpgThe late great Sage Ramana Maharshi proclaimed that the final truth consists of the fact that there is no path, nor any such thing as progress. In other words, Reality is not some sort of attainment to be gained by a progression from state to state.

There is no final, triumphant union to be attained, because there never was any separation from the no-beginning. There is simply the unfathomable expanse of spontaneous presence, pure unborn awareness, regardless of any intermittent mental content which might appear in that sphere of being.

Recognizing the empty nature of both the dreaming as well as the dreamer is consideredRamana M.jpg by the sages to be liberation, though paradoxically, there is nobody being freed or bound. There is simply awakening to that which has always been the case, even as we daydreamed.”

~Bob O’Hearn
The Paradox of Inherent Perfection

https://theconsciousprocess.wordpress.com/2014/06/09/the-paradox-of-inherent-perfection/

***

 

“So then, here’s the drama. My metaphysics, let me be perfectly frank with you, are that there is the central Self, you could call it God you could call it anything you like. And its all of us. Its playing all the parts of all beings whatsoever everywhere and anywhere.

Alan Watts.jpgAnd its playing the game of hide and seek with itself. It gets lost, it gets involved in the farthest out adventures but in the end it always wakes up, and comes back to itself. And when you’re ready to wake up, you’re gonna wake up. And if you’re not ready your gonna stay pretending that you’re poor little me.”

Alan Watts – The Way of Waking UP
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7blUYJm6i-c