2019 – Year of Beginnings

For this third day of January 2019, my post will be a mix of influences I’ve witnessed since January first.

Lee-Harrispicimage.jpgIt started with an energy update from Lee Harris on “2019 – Year of Beginnings” which I think is worth hearing, so I’ll list it here if anyone is interested:  https://www.leeharrisenergy.com/p/january-2019-energy-update

The gist of it from my notes was that this is the year of elevation (out of the mire of contentiousness and social dishevel).  2012 – 2019 was a 7-year cycle of clearing us energetically.  2019 – 2026 is a cycle of elevation – a brand new beginning bringing with it a lot of momentum and forward movement.  He says to create your personal change powerfully and purposefully. Live life more passionately.  Expect January to be more of the bubbling to the surface of major issues, but February is the beginning of the change—a vocal ‘stand up and speak your truth’ month. This is the time right now to be very clear on exactly what you DO want in your life, as that is what you will call to you now.  Speak your truth and stand up for what is right for all.

So then shortly after seeing the Lee Harris video, someone put through this gorgeous 49301924_2441835785844099_6951581753156829184_n.jpgsnowflake on Facebook that I found mesmerizing along with a quote from Einstein, one of my personal heroes.

“The basic laws of the universe are simple, but because our senses are limited, we can’t grasp them. There is a pattern in creation. If we look at this tree outside whose roots search beneath the pavement for water, or a flower which sends its sweet smell to the pollinating bees, or even our own selves and the inner forces that drive us to act, we can see that we all dance to a mysterious tune..”   Albert Einstein
snowflake photo by Kenneth Libbrecht

Quote source: How Einstein Saw the World
https://creativesystemsthinking.wordpress.com/2014/02/16/how-einstein-saw-the-world/

 

Then the next day “Tao and Zen” on Facebook added another D. T. Suzuki quote that I thought really explains how you incorporate that Zen  perspective into everything you do:

49511253_2446887465338931_7342677059904208896_n.jpg“The idea of Zen is to catch life as it flows. There is nothing extraordinary or mysterious about Zen. I raise my hand; I take a book from the other side of the desk; I hear the boys playing ball outside my window; I see the clouds blown away beyond the neighboring wood — in all these I am practicing Zen, I am living Zen. No wordy discussion is necessary, nor any explanation… When the sun rises the whole world dances with joy and everybody’s heart is filled with bliss. If Zen is at all conceivable, it must be taken hold of here.”   D.T. Suzuki

Zen & the Art of Living Deeply
https://creativesystemsthinking.wordpress.com/2016/05/15/zen-the-art-of-living-deeply/

***

In summary, to me as we start this new year together, I choose to view it as Lee Harris does—that it is a year of beginnings, so let’s stand up and speak our truth and choose our way forward with clear intentions and a strong sense of purpose.

Then as Einstein said, let’s recognize our interconnectedness and the Divine Plan behind our social, cultural, and even personal interactions occurring on this one living planet that we all share.

And lastly, as D.T. Suzuki said, “Be grateful for everything. Observe without judgment. Consume less, create more. Let go of fears and desires. Listen to understand not to respond. Be patient and generous. Love deeply.  Live simply.”

Here on this third day of January 2019, I think those are good personal goals to adopt.

Works for me.

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The Return of Primordial Light

Holiday messages are nice, and many received reflect the overall appeal and optimism of the season, no matter the faith.rbuckminsterfuller67-2x.jpg

I am not religious. I do not follow or prescribe any particular recognized religion.  But I write about the many aspects of spirituality that personally appeal, because to me spirituality means our personal connection to the energies around us and from which we have emerged. And that is how I relate to all of those different religious philosophies.

buckyuniverse68.jpgYou can call those philosophical energies “Universe” as Buckminster Fuller did, or you can call them The Tao as ancient Chinese philosophers did, or you can call them God or Yahweh as Judeo-Christian traditions proclaim, or you can simply call them the Transcendent Still Point of All Being.

Whatever you wish to call them, many believers feel especially close to key tenets of those religious philosophies this time of year—sending peace, love and good wishes to all.

I would say that the philosophy of the Shamanic tradition is a very nature-based, direct connection to life and the cosmos we inhabit, and as I watched that beautiful full moon setting outside my window on this winter solstice, I gave thanks for the view and for my part in the whole of this present earth-based drama. A few days ago Alberto Villoldo of Four Winds Society, sent out his winter-solstice, holiday email to all who subscribe. I found it pretty appropriate to our current situation, so I’ll share it here.

“From the bottom of our hearts all of us at the Four Winds Society want to wish you a holy and joyous Solstice on December 21, 2018.

We invite you to light a candle or a small fire in your backyard and join medicine men and women around the world who are gathering on the evening of the Solstice to pray for the “return of the Light.”villoldoenergyquote

This is not the ordinary daylight we all wish we had more of in the Northern hemisphere (and a bit less of in the South), but the Primordial Light.

Primordial Light is the creative power of the Universe which is available to us to create beauty in the world, and to heal ourselves and others. But to work with Primordial Light we must remember the way of the luminous warrior. We must live and act fearlessly, know the answer to “Who am I?” and the ways beyond death into infinity.

Like the shamans of old, we are luminous warriors. We dare to speak the truth, uphold universal values that honor all life, and perform daily acts of courage.

This is so important in this age of cowardice where half-truths are readily embraced as real.

We wish you the strength and steadfastness to continue creating the sacred every day and dreaming a new and healthy world into being.

In Beauty,    Alberto, Marcela, and the Four Winds Society team.”

And to that I would simply add that during this holiday season and throughout the year ahead, be at peace no matter the circumstance, be love no matter the degree of hatred all around you, be as courageous as you were always meant to be, standing tall in the midst of such cowardice in our governing bodies—stand tall and speak your truth.

This is what we do—this is who we are. We, as Luminous Warriors of Divine Primordial Light, welcome the return of the Light—the return to TRUTH as a Universal Standard for governance.

truthbuckyquote56.jpg

Blessings to you and yours, and may the year ahead be full of love and laughter for all of us.

Let’s make it a good year for everyone!

rbuckminsterfuller1-2x

Does the Human Brain Create or Receive the MIND?

Just saw Deepak Chopra’s latest article: “A Brain Theory That Work – If You Turn It Upside Down” http://j.mp/2AKlDg6  and instantly acknowledged that his theories are likely the inspiration behind my own beliefs that the human brain is not so much a “creator” of 47506493_10155969808855665_7180001492781236224_n.jpggeneral consciousness but is more so a “receiver” of available transmissions from the Great Reservoir of Consciousness.

What do I mean by that? 

Our brains do create the physical capability (hardware device) to comprehend what is happening around us but they do not create ALL that is comprehensible, because that quantity of pure consciousness would far exceed our brain’s capacity to contain it.  It would simply “blow our minds” with information overload.

So with this theory of human brain as principle receiver rather than the primary creator of consciousness, all that is (1) known, (2) knowable and (3) beyond our human comprehension does exist in that unlimited reservoir of pure consciousness, but the quantity of consciousness that you can receive from the reservoir is directly dependent on your band-width capability (your pipeline capacity) that you are receiving from the reservoir.

An example: Think of the enormity of the Colorado River being held back behind the massive Hoover Dam, and someone taps a small 2-inch diameter pipe into the face of that dam wall to allow a high-powered stream of held-back water to squirt forth from that pipeline. That’s a lot of pressurized water pouring out of there in a short time, but it isn’t overwhelming to you.Hoover Dam354.jpg

Now consider a much larger 10-inch diameter pipe being tapped into that same dam wall-face, and then imagine the quantity and force of the water flow emerging from that wider band-width connection.  That would easily be powerful enough to wash you away with the force of its flow when it hits.

Lastly imagine that a huge chunk of the dam wall-face suddenly collapses, and the quantity, force and power of that powerful wall of water comes slamming down onto you with the massive increase in the river’s untamable flow.  You probably wouldn’t be around to even consider what had hit you.

That water-flow comparison among various diameter taps into the dam reservoir represents the comparative difference in our capacity to tap into and receive information from the pure consciousness reservoir.  Unlimited/unrestricted access to the reservoir of pure consciousness, as I mentioned previously, would absolutely blow your mind (your personal receiver) apart.

brainmagiccreation55.jpgAs Chopra also states, scientific theories are still fluid over the brain’s role in creating or receiving consciousness, along with the role of light-wave frequency and vibration in the quality of the consciousness received. He cites the ancient Vedic Seer’s version of a theory called Shabda.

He states:  “I doubt that anyone will abandon a vibrational theory of consciousness just because it has a fatal flaw. The assumption that the brain physically produces the mind is too ingrained. But it’s worth commenting that in ancient India creation was also described in terms of vibration, in a theory called Shabda. It holds that anything, including the entire objective universe and the entire world of mind, can be assigned a vibrational frequency, and this frequency holds each thing together. So far, Shabda agrees with modern physics in a general way.

But Shabda explains that the vibrations have a conscious source in the same absolute, pure awareness that is the source of creation. Therefore,

wetapthereservoir.jpg

it isn’t baffling that resonance exists or that the infinite complexity of neurons talking to each other results in thoughts that make sense. Consciousness organizes the whole process from top to bottom—it knows what it’s doing….”

Shoshin – The Beginner’s Mind

Sounds a bit paradoxical, but I can easily say that despite lessIknow45.pnghow much I’ve often thought that I knew throughout my life, or how hard-won that advanced knowledge came into being for me, the older I get the better I appreciate how little I actually DO know.

In truth it seems that with every passing day I feel this almost humorous certainty growing stronger within me: a certainty-of-my-own-ignorance—that jolting realization that what you once believed to be truth, actually wasn’t, and you may never know the REAL truth no matter how old or knowledgeable you become because that TRUTH exists in a realm that is incomprehensible to your present existence.

This body shock of awakening to our own innate ignorance can be scathingly honest and quite humbling.

It certainly was to my ego.

But to those who study Zen, this isn’t some new concept—some might simply call it ‘cultivating the Beginner’s Mind.’

What is Beginner’s Mind?  Here’s a good explanation first from Wikipedia, then from a Zen master himself.

Shoshin (初心) is a concept in Zen Buddhism meaning ‘beginner’s mind.’ It refers to having shozinbeginnersmind.pngan attitude of openness, eagerness, and lack of preconceptions when studying a subject, even when studying at an advanced level, just as a beginner in that subject would. The term is especially used in the study of Zen Buddhism and Japanese martial arts.”

Text source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin

Master Shunryu Suzuki can explain it far better than I can:

“People say that practicing Zen is difficult, but there is a misunderstanding as to why. It is not difficult because it is hard to sit in the cross‑legged position, or to attain enlightenment. It is difficult because it is hard to keep our mind pure and our practice pure in its fundamental sense.

In Japan we have the phrase shoshin, which means ‘beginner’s mind.’ The goal of practice is always to keep our beginner’s mind…

For Zen students the most important thing is not to be dualistic. Our ‘original mind’ includes everything within itself. It is always rich and sufficient within itself. You should not lose your self‑sufficient state of mind.

This does not mean a closed mind, but actually an empty mind and a ready mind. If your mind is empty, it is always ready for anything; it is open to everything. In the beginner’s mind there are many possibilities; in the expert’s mind there are few.

The most difficult thing is always to keep your beginner’s mind. There is no need to have a deep understanding of Zen. Even though you read much Zen literature, you must read each sentence with a fresh mind.

You should not say, ‘I know what Zen is,’ or ‘I have attained enlightenment.’ This is shoshinmaster.jpgalso the real secret of the arts: always be a beginner.

Be very, very careful about this point. If you start to practice zazen, you will begin to appreciate your beginner’s mind. It is the secret of Zen practice.”

Shunryu Suzuki
from Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind

 

So I acknowledge that here I sit in my own ignorance while trying to make sense of our life existence.

These are the very things I often write about: What is reality?—What is consciousness?—What are we doing here? Why are we here? Who benefits and how do they benefit from our incarnating here during this time period or ANY time period?

All those unanswerable questions come down to the battle in our minds over the relevance between our DOING and our BEING.

Here is a basic truth as I presently know it:  I AM.  I EXIST.  I EXPERIENCE.  I OBSERVE.

And I try like the dickens NOT to judge the value of what I am observing because to do so implies a comparative knowledgebase that I do not have—at least not from my humble human perspective.

the-older-i-get-the-less-i-know-by-that-i-mean-the-less-i-am-sure-of-i-view-p-403x403-nkb3nfSo each day I open my eyes and wonder what this day will bring to me. I wonder what new realization will occur to my sensing abilities. I wonder what type of sense I can make of whatever is happening to me and around me, but knowing full well that ‘making sense’ is a judgment in itself.

However, I also know that only through shoshinbeginner’s mind—can I simply observe all and note those observances without judgment or expectation—knowing I must simply allow all occurrences (and not labeling them as ‘good’ or ‘bad’) to flow along with the river of life into the great sea of consciousness that connects us all and patiently awaits our return.

This I also know:  Beginner’s Mind is not easily achieved nor sustained for long unless you willingly intend it.

Identifying Perimeters

leafcapillaries.jpgThis image fascinated me—the intricacies of the water dispersion system in the leaf itself.

Of course it wasn’t the first up-close view I’ve had of a leaf’s moisture-dispersal system, but it was the image that so clearly defined the leaf capillary perimeter that caught my eye.  Look closely at that perimeter.  What told the leaf to create that particular perimeter border and to stop spreading those veins outward into infinity?

Recognizing that leaf perimeter is so important because it actually defines the origin of the leaf— it represents the tree species that created the leaf.

See the next image to better understand that a leaf petreeidentifyshapes83.jpgrimeter is indicative of the plant’s DNA and the growing environment that produced it. 

And while there are many leaf shapes for all those multitudes of tree DNA, all have the same function on the tree.

“Function of leaves leafcotoosystem

 

The function of leaves is to help the plant produce food by converting the energy in sunlight into chemical energy that the plant can eat. Chlorophyll is the molecule in the structure of the leaves that takes the energy in sunlight to turn water and carbon dioxide gas into sugar and oxygen gas. This conversion process is known as photosynthesis.  The structures within the leaf convert the energy and make it possible for the plant to get food. … The leaf also has veins that can help to support the leaf by transporting food, water and minerals to the leaf and to the plant.”

So while I am mid-research into leaf function and leaf shapes, I find the shape that most matches the original image above showing the elaborate capillary system appears to be a leaf from the Bodhi tree.bodhitreewithleaves.jpg

Okay. What is significant about that? Well, to Buddhists the Bodhi tree is extremely significant because it was the location chosen by Siddhartha Guatama to meditate under until he reached enlightenment. He sat there supposedly for 49 days and endured unimaginable difficulties during the process before he transcended earthly existence and experienced the purity of Source itself; and was forever changed by it.

“Bodhi Tree – Fig Tree

buddhaunderbodhitree69.jpg

The Bodhi Tree, also known as Bo, “peepal tree”, or “arasa maram, was a large and ancient sacred fig tree located in Bodh Gaya, Bihar, India, under which Siddhartha Gautama, the spiritual teacher who became known as the Buddha, is said to have attained enlightenment or Bodhi. In religious iconography, the Bodhi Tree is recognizable by its heart-shaped leaves, which are usually prominently displayed.”  (Wikapedia)

So I’ve suddenly realized that my initial intention on writing about the intricate leaf structure and its defining perimeter has gone astray with educational sidebars.  Now I’m even into the tale of Buddha. Does this still pertain to my original intention of showing that a tree’s DNA defines the majesty of the tree’s stature/shape and the shape of its identifying leaves all while I miraculously segue into how our own DNA shapes the perimeter of our lives and defines us, only if we let it?

Well, maybe or maybe not.  It’s not the most direct route taken to a conclusion. But that’s part of the point here, I think.

We, as individual leaves growing outward from our Soul Source are defined to some extent by our DNA, by our ancestral history of nature and nurture, and by our karmic debts from all other lives. Our personal leaf perimeters are somewhat distinct and defined because of those factors mentioned. You even know which tree we grew from by our shapes and functional life success.

But at the same time, we have potential for unimaginable changefor breaking through our pre-defined perimeters.

Take the Buddha himself. He wanted to be enlightened so badly that he was willing to sit in meditation until he ceased to exist in this world or until he reached the Source of All Knowledge and Wisdom itself.  Fortunately for him and for the rest of us, he tapped into that Source and survived to share his experiences with the rest of us.

You don’t have to be religious to appreciate the enlightened mind or what it took/takes to reach that state of awareness. And some would argue that Buddhism isn’t actually a religion as much as it is simply a philosophical path toward enlightenment. That tangent is not my concern today.

It would appear that during this leaf examination I have spread my word capillaries far from original intentions and only reined them back with a fragile border of pertinence.

The only other thing I know for certain is that my Bodhi tree still awaits me.

foster_bodhi_leaves.jpg

 

The Morality of Consciousness

“Everything in the Universe, throughout all its kingdoms, is conscious: i.e., endowed with a consciousness of its own kind and on its own plane of perception…” ~ Helena Blavatsky

einstwein and rabindranath .jpg

Morality is one of those words that mean different things to different people. As Helena Blavatsky (of the Theosophical Society fame) stated above: We, as do all other things, have our own kind of consciousness, and that consciousness is based on our personal plane of perception.

So to some people, morality may mean nothing at all because it would be counter to that person’s self-interest. You needn’t look farther than the news shows to see that demonstrated daily.

But for mutual understanding, what exactly is MORALITY?

I’ll list Wikipedia’s more expansive version of what morality means:

“Morality is the differentiation of intentions, decisions and actions between those that are distinguished as proper and those that are improper. Morality can be a body of standards or principles derived from a code of conduct from a particular philosophy, religion or culture, or it can derive from a standard that a person believes should be universal. Morality may also be specifically synonymous with “goodness” or “rightness”.”

Talk about subjective interpretations of morality in those personal planes of perception.

Perhaps my concepts of ‘goodness’ and ‘rightness’ are quite different than others. I know as I listen to Evangelical preachers on television harping on Christian morals and righteousness that I often wonder how their own stated hypocrisy over supporting such corrupt and vile government leadership can so easily skew their personal sense of righteousness and godliness.

To me, that seems very strange indeed.  Morality clarkquotemorality67.jpgfor them must be more transitive and dependent on their personal desires that coincide with standing before large groups of gullible people willing to be led in the preacher’s desired direction.  Isn’t that called manipulation rather than salvation?

I personally like Einstein’s concept of religious morality: “My religiosity consists in a humble admiration of the infinitely superior spirit that reveals itself in the little that we, with our weak and transitory understanding, can comprehend of reality. Morality is of the highest importance—but for us, not for God.”

Morality?  Universal standards of rightness and goodness?  How does this compare to our present state of national affairs?

Seems a little off to me but then, who am I to judge?

I’m just an American voter.

 

Kaypache Lescher on “The Great Mystery of the Divine”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zhcn__6FWUg&feature=share

What is my life about?  Why did I incarnate?345kaypacha1-400x400 (1).jpg

At present, Kaypache is into the shamanic astrology of Peru, where he is traveling.   I’ll just paraphrase a few of his statements here rather than use direct quotes:

In this video, he expounds on receiving direct transmissions from nature and the cosmos—letting Spirit speak directly to you or through you.  Spiritual awakening involves being taken out of this existence—of our returning to our Source—exploring our multidimensionality—witnessing the infinite universe—experiencing actual transcendence.  But it is spiritual awakening without using substances to do so—no hallucinogens—no ayahuasca—simply natural spiritual awakening, slowly and gradually.

He also believes (as I do) that it takes time to evolve and awaken.  You need patience, perseverance, endurance, … because true spiritual awakening happens very slowly—and it SHOULD BE slowly revealed because brief, powerful glimpses of the Divine can be more disrupting than slow, steady emergence into a higher state of being and emergence into the Bliss-field.

divinemysteryheader-logo.jpg

But does my life have meaning? you still ask.

Well, similar to Alan Watts declarations, Kaypache says there is no meaning to our lives other than living—existing—you have NO particular purpose for this life—life existed prior to you and will exist long after you.  What we create in our lifetime is what we gain from life.

We aren’t here to find ourselves but to create ourselves.  We must go within and close our eyes and tap into Source or the Divine that wants to emerge out from us and be birthed into this world through our existence.  Or maybe NOT.    (Again he sounds very ‘Alan Watts’ here to me, but as I mentioned earlier, Alan Watts videos are resurging again which makes sense since Kaypache talks about that 51-year cycle beginning again now.)

When you can simply sit still, the truth is revealed, the mystery unfolds—all things come to whoever waits for them.

345kaypacha1-400x400 (2).jpgThis is the equinox point of the 51-year cycle of Chiron (the wounded centaur healer—the Master Teacher)—very powerful cycle for finding the deeper purpose in your life experience.

Chiron is also associated with crisis—like a physical health crisis.  That health crisis sits you down to reflect on your very existence.  This reflection time on our own mortality helps us to gain greater understanding of the archetypal energies of which we are only a part.

Kaypache’s parting words are: Take your time—be still—and in the stillness, the mystery of your life will be revealed.

 

“I close my eyes and what do I find,578AbsoluteBliss.jpg

My body, my Soul, and my mind,

Revealing to me when I’m ready to see,

The Great Mystery of the Divine.”