When Is a Problem Really a Problem?

probdeinit453.jpgIn today’s world, the possible answer to that title question would be a “problem” for you is when you perceive the situation as a problem, otherwise the perplexing situation simply IS—it exists in front of you dependent on your personal interaction with it.  But that situation’s existence and your interaction with it may lie in some currently unknown context and you can’t presently make proper sense of it, so you may mistakenly perceive the immediate situation as A PROBLEM.

That is the danger of fragmented thinking. When we fail to consider the wholeness of the setting and situation’s context, and of ourselves interacting physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually within that environment, we limit ourselves to seeing only parts of the total scenario—fragments of the whole—and sometimes we see only the parts that we want to see or have trained ourselves to notice, while ignoring other pertinent information about the situation.

So perhaps our presently confusing life situation isn’t so much a genuine problem, as WE are labeling it a problem by not properly understanding the situation’s true context—we don’t understand our ROLE in this broader life drama.

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Confused yet?  Aren’t we all—that’s our biggest conundrum of this shared life experience.  We can’t seem to grasp the overall CONTEXT of why we are here interacting with each other in this crazy, erratic game of LIFE.

While that simplified explanation of a perceived problem and the context that it may ultimately exist in might sound like nonsense, it is actually describing a baby-step toward a more expansive way of viewing the world and reconsidering everything existing within it.

Here’s a video sample of a David Bohm’s explanation on What is the nature of reality?  taken from a 1990 physics and spirituality conference in Amsterdam.  (Notice the Dalai Lama sitting beside him.) [**“David Bohm (1917-1992) an American theoretical bohmanddalailamaconfphysicist who contributed innovative and unorthodox ideas to quantum theory, philosophy of mind, and neuropsychology, …”]

David Bohm speaks about Wholeness and (the dangers of) Fragmentation (fragmented thinking):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mDKB7GcHNac&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR0g1ZwJ8VvppoHq2_CCE8vhLrTPVwKs3v9AU9Jv2Um6xJGZ3hTVPN0-0R0

 “I think the difficulty is this fragmentation..  All thought is broken up into bits. Like this nation, this country, this industry, this profession and so on… And they can’t meet. That comes about because thought has developed traditionally in a way such that it claims not to be affecting anything but just telling you the way things are. Therefore, people cannot see that they are creating a problem and then apparently trying to solve itWholeness is an attitude or approach to the whole of life. If we can have a coherent approach to reality then reality will respond coherently to us..”      ~David Bohm,  Amsterdam, 1990

bohm quote on thinkling

**“…(Bohm) is widely considered to be one of the most significant theoretical physicists of the 20th century. In physics, Bohm advanced the view that the old Cartesian model of reality was limited, in the light of developments in quantum physics. He developed in detail a mathematical and physical theory of implicate and explicate order to complement it. Bohm warned of the dangers of rampant reason and technology, advocating instead the need for genuine supportive dialogue which he claimed could broaden and unify conflicting and troublesome divisions in the social world. In this, his epistemology mirrored his ontological viewpoint. He believed that the working of the brain, at the cellular level, obeyed the mathematics of some quantum effects. Therefore he postulated that thought was distributed and non-localised in the way that quantum entities do not readily fit into our conventional model of space and time (Wikipedia).”

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