One Last Chance to Visit 3 Presenters from the “Understanding Narcissism” Summit

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Just saw the email from Tami Simons (Sounds True) on a last chance to hear Caroline Myss’s presentation that I wrote about earlier, ( https://content.soundstrue.com/understanding-narcissism-summit-encore?utm_source=bronto&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=C191116-UNS-Sell4&utm_content=Myss,+Hanson,+and+Neff+-+Free+Encore+Presentations&_bta_tid=09528543415476418810300132756200661561082200615837475413618082489837536028413298474285896175960726012765&_bta_c=azpcfyz2d505smzjcvmh15bka8yxt),  as well as two additional presenters, one of which I am reviewing here today.

This one is called “Healthy Confidence” by Rick Hanson, PhD.  Initially I didn’t understand (or appreciate) why Rick’s focus was on looking for a healthy approach to milder aspects of narcissism. So today when I listened again, I did so with the consideration that for some reason Tami and Jeffery thought that out of the 20 presenters listed, not only Caroline was offered again (which I easily 4dbb3d925440f266e9f3a71eaca87e9c.jpgunderstood), but also offered again for some reason was Rick Hanson’s presentation which to me represented the counter argument for considering mild forms of narcissism as building blocks for establishing a sense of solid self-esteem.

Then I listened more closely to what Rick was actually stressing here and he sounded very “Dr. Joe Dispenza” to me—more about healing yourself by holding the higher love-frequency emotions and using positive reinforcement to establish new patterns of brain function.  Then it made sense why he was offered as an encore. It was a positive presentation of helping others to help themselves in terms of self-worth.  Here are a few quotes:

“It’s about narcissism vs. self-worth—helping people develop (constructive) concepts of true self-worth to help those (more destructive) narcissistic tendencies fall away. Narcissists have a hollowness inside—an emptiness that they keep trying to fill with external recognition and a fair amount of self-preoccupation.  …”

He researched mother-toddler pairs and how those interactions created the solidity or lack-thereof in early childhood development.  “ …dismissive or indifferent early-childhood care-givers often created the void felt by infants that later led to excessive self-focused behaviors…”  It involved negative enforcement for undesirable infant behavior rather than a positive approach to desirable behaviors. … meaning, caregivers ignoring crying, disruptive behaviors, etc.

“It’s not abusive parental behavior, as it is simply a behavioral modification style that the parent believes is necessary and beneficial to the child and family in the long run, but which actually creates a feeling of unmet needs in the infant and child. … the child has yearnings for personal connection and love—to feel cared for and appreciated…these are normal human needs that are then met or unmet by the style of the caregiver. …

“Feelings of low worth and insecurity lead to self-preoccupation of feeling inadequate or insecure that push away the needs of other people in favor of fulfilling their own.  Overt narcissism is an endless pulling of social supplies from other people to fill that hole in the heart. …

“How do we grow healthy self-confidence? …How do we heal that old pain of never being good enough or adequate enough? … (Hungry ghost stuff). …

“Self-directed neuro-plasticity ….any kind of lasting change psychologically must be your-neurotransmitters-and-.jpgthrough lasting change physically. We become less demanding of others…we can be in relationships without making it all about ourselves. … especially create changes in the nervous system and the brain that make lasting learning… neurons that fire together wire together… help the experience leave a lasting physical experience behind to provide a memory that fuels our desirable behavior change.  …We become active agents of our own process of healing and transformation … Have the experience and enjoy it—really enjoy it—help those neurons form physical structures of brainwave patterns.  Stay with a positive experience for a few breaths to help it solidify in your brain. … somatic experiences—body sensations help us retain the benefits of the experience.  It is a rewarded feeling—we are being positively reinforced about our experience and it releases dopamine and serotonin in the brain.  Those ‘feel good’ chemicals released into our bloodstream that helps us feel good about ourselves.  …

“When we feel our worth, it represents something that we feel is true. We recognize it as a positive experience—we feel good about it. See it—feel it—internalize it. …

“Four major sources of self-worth (or self-confidence)—how you fill yourself up to feel good about yourself despite what others might think about you:

  • The 1st is to feel ‘cared about or caring’, …authentic experiences of warm-heartedness or altruistic love.index.jpg
  • 2nd is recognizing your own good qualities—natural talents, disciplined, hard-worker, perseverer, etc.
  • 3rd is experiencing and recognizing your true nature deep down—wakefulness, goodness, lovingness, Buddha-nature, childlike innocence, delight in existing, good wishes toward others, wishing to help others,
  • 4th is forgiving yourself, …self-compassion, healing shame, letting go of criticism, pardoning yourself but taking accurate responsibility for your actions and then moving forward in positive ways toward a better way of being.” ….

***

Jeffery: “How does this process soften narcissistic tendencies?” 

Rick:  “I’ve seen when people do this simple receiving practice of filling themselves with love and positive experience, they feel ‘more full’ inside, it lessens their craving for unmet needs, and tames craving of needing the opinions and acceptance of others.  They feel less a sense of deficit—of something missing because that person has then learned how to self-fulfill themselves with positive feelings of true self-worth. …”  

Jeffery:  “…so you don’t have to reduce narcissistic tendencies, you simply have to build a greater sense of true self-worth?”

Rick:  “With therapeutic help and cultivating a larger shift in perspective, it helps to regulate the ‘need factor’ of how we tend to use others for fulfilling own sense of worth.”

***

Okay. That is my quick-take of Rick Hanson’s presentation and his professional opinions as a practicing psychologist and a therapist, and to some degree I assume his techniques may be successful with those who have milder narcissistic tendencies, but with those who are severely narcissistic and primarily self-focused, I just can’t imagine that this treatment is truly and lastingly effective.  But again, that is just my opinion, and what do I know anyway. … 🙂

But I do agree with giving a child a healthy sense of self-worth, and in defining what the difference is between narcissism and actually creating a healthy sense of self-worth.

***

To that end I could more easily agree with Dr. Kristin Neff who was also offered on the page, on the ‘difference between self-esteem and self compassion’ and the importance of standing up for oneself against a malignant narcissist.

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The Mind Recognizes Patterns–Understanding PTSD

I was examining a desktop image of a jaguar lying on the river bank in a jungle setting and thinking how easy it would be in real life for the jaguar to simply slip back about five feet into that tangled jungle maze and be completely disguised by the surrounding multi-fronds of tans and various shades of green dangling throughout this natural setting.

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Seeing the jaguar then would be like one of those “Find the beach ball in this mass of balloons” puzzle that tricks the eye and challenges the intellect. While the eye might distinguish differences among the numerous lights and darks and elongated linear shapes in the picture, the mind determines the recognizable patterns within the picture frame.

To even recognize cat-shape and leopard–spots you must have seen them prior and attributed a label or a “name” to that general shape and texture so that upon seeing a simile of a “spotted-cat,” the mind immediately tries to identify it in some way to determine the jagstalkingyou45relative safety for our personal being in the situation.

While seeing a picture of a jaguar sunning on a jungle riverbank isn’t exactly hazardous to our health, seeing the real thing lying only a few feet from us might be, and the mind reacts to that possibility with a subtle or a pronounced warning signal. If you’ve ever been in a close encounter with a jaguar, even the above picture itself could trigger a spurt of adrenaline through us by preparing us for a “fight or flight” response.

How we naturally react to whatever we encounter depends on our personal history with the situation or the subject matter.

This is the problem many military personnel face when they return from fighting in war zones.  No matter where they are, no matter the actual setting around them, metaphorically they see the density of the jungle surrounding them and expectjageyealertwatching the jaguar to be lurking there ready to attack them—except the jaguar would be in human form armed with rifles and explosives, and the “jungle” could be any suspicious setting—urban or rural—where human jaguars might lie in wait for them—ready to attack.  Those who have known some form of combat can’t relax because they know “the jaguar” is always there—ready to pounce if they simply let down their guard for a moment.

This is a trick of the mind when encountering remote similarities in our lives: Our minds try to protect us by alertly recognizing patterns that might prove hazardous to our being.

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Our minds often do not differentiate between the nuances of “home” settings which should be considered safe or of “war” settings which would be considered unsafe. The mind simply recognizes any patterns of possible “enemy concealment” in our surroundings along with the uncertainty of what lies beyond the next turn in the road or the ominous new direction of the curving path before us.

Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome (PTSD) is quite real. And there should be NO stigma related to our mind simply trying to protect us from any perceived danger, even in supposedly SAFE settings (which in today’s world there seem to be fewer of).

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PTSD is our own mind simply trying to keep us alive the best way it can, because the world we have known in the past was a pretty scary place to be. 

There are many ways to help the mind retrain itself to be less reactive to what we might have once perceived as a threat.  Many therapists now employ techniques like EMDR, or Tapping, or hypnosis, or flashing light therapies, or even other techniques that I’m presently unaware of.

The therapeutic community has advanced considerably over the last decade, so if you’d like to learn a bit more about these newer therapies, I suggest these two books that I emdrmadesimplebookpersonally own: EMDR Made Simple: 4 Approaches to Using EMDR with Every Client, by Jamie Marich; and TAPPING IN: A Step-By-Step Guide to Activating Your Healing Resources Through Bilateral Stimulation, by Laurel Parnell. PhD.tappinginparnell.jpg

I wasn’t a combat vet but awhile back I had some PTSD of my own, and both books helped me to clear away the constant mental hyper-alertness and helped to uncover and release the deeply-held, hidden fears by utilizing those two techniques: EMDR and Tapping (Bilateral Stimulation).

You can give them a try just by reading the books.  Both of those books talk you through what to do. If they seem to help, you might then find a good therapist who offers one or both of those techniques to help reset your mind’s pattern recognition.

There is NO stigma attached to PTSD. It is simply the mind doing what it does naturally—trying to keep us safe from harm.

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That’s to be applauded, not condemned.

 

Roller Coaster Energies

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I can’t speak for others or what you might personally be feeling, but as an energy-empath I can feel the current turbulence in the energy ocean surrounding us.  After listening to a couple people online who also regularly follow the energies of this time period (Kaypache and Lee Harris), they also are mentioning the energy extremes occurring for us at present.

Harris said it was like riding a roller coaster up, down, over, around, and then repeating it over and over. So take your Dramamine.  ( https://www.leeharrisenergy.com/july-2019-energy-update )

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Here’s how he phrased it:

“We are definitely in a period of EXTREMES – with extreme speed, extreme transformation and extreme and unexpected happenings in our lives waking us up and shaking us up. As we go through July and August, that unexpected and extreme energy is going to come into sharp focus – both for individuals and for all of us as a collective.

The main themes for July focus on how we can SURF THE EXTREME ENERGY:

  • ALIGNMENT AND REJECTION
  • ELEVATION AND DEPLETION
  • REALIZATION AND REFLECTION …”

***

You can check out his page and video for details, but what I want to mention is this: Energy turbulence all around us creates anxiety within us—an unsettled feeling—an uncertainty—we feel unsure of what is happening and how to react to it—we don’t feel as grounded as we might normally feel—we don’t feel as sure of ourselves and of our ability to deal with whatever we might face.

And in one sense all of those affects can have nothing to do with us personally and yet EVERYTHING to do with us collectively.

kapacheport452.jpgKaypache (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EbXHGJg9WRo&feature=share ) described it as a time of deep diving into our repressed emotional wounds to allow the pain to surface, to be reexamined, and then to be willingly released. These turbulent energies are shaking us up and creating the instability within us to allow those repressed feelings and pains from childhood onwards to be released from us completely.  But you have to be willing to reflect on the effect that those experiences have previously had on you, and then to simply let them go. It’s not easily done, but it is VERY necessary to do it, and this is the perfect energy time for it to happen.

“I need to really love myself, In order to go back and heal the wounds of my personal past, to keep my life on track. …

…It’s not easy to go into what we consider our vulnerable weaknesses, and yet, it is where we find our greatest gold! The “outside” may be demanding a lot of our attention, but I’m feeling that it is a test, only a test, of how much we love ourselves. Will we neglect our own personal processes and growth to meet the demands of “the Man,” or will we be strong enough to realize when we have given enough and refuse to be intimidated into giving more. The rewards are great for the inner work which is not so valued in this high paced, expensive, world. It takes guts! Let’s do it!”

***

coasterkids2 (1).jpgBasically all I want to do is to mention to any one reading my blog that IF you are feeling this inner anxiety or a sense of turbulence in your life, and you see no real reason for it, then don’t despair—you aren’t slipping off the deep end.  These are the effects of the energies we are swimming in at present.  They do have a purpose in all their disruption, though it might not seem like a pleasant one.

And if the personal disruption gets too strong and you feel unstable and unable to handle it, then get some help.  Counselors may not understand the “energy turbulence” part, but they are well-versed in allowing you to “talk out” the repressed issues that might be arising for you now because of that energy disruption.

Just saying, …if you have no idea what is actually happening to you, then it can feel pretty mentally destabilizing when all your old STUFF starts swirling around in your head or coming up in your face.

I’m not a certified counselor or a psychologist, but I do know how disruptive these energies can be to your ‘sense of self’—to that concept of who you believe yourself to be, which includes how you’ve always considered yourself.

And the entire point of the current energy disruption is to allow you to release the “old sense of you’ and to encourage the NEW and IMPROVED YOU (the higher-frequency you) to emerge and blossom.

It’s that old ‘water glass scenario’ again—you can’t refill your glass with that pure, clear, nourishing water until you first pour out the old spoiled milk from it, and then thoroughly scrub the glass before refilling.cleanwaterglass44

While it’s totally necessary to do it, it’s often not a pleasant housekeeping task.

Hang in there!  We’ll get through it.

 

“The Neurophysiology of Spiritual Guidance”

dr stephanie mines.jpgDr. Stephanie Mines in this TEDx Talk video says that “Clear (spiritual) guidance is an integrated, holistic neuro-chemical phenomenon that forever transforms the individual who experiences it, recalibrating the nervous system.” ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQOAxT8llto )

Mines is a psychologist who describes herself as “an advocate to clearing personal and collective trauma by unburdening the overwhelmed nervous system.”  She has a clinic and offers training in what is called The TARA Approach, which is an energy-releasing practice, such as releasing the trapped energies of shock or trauma for clients.

In this particular TED talk she elaborates on how to become more intuitive and Neuro+Resiliency.pngspiritually guided in your life: “Let your body become the tuning fork for harmonious efforts…(to make this a better world). …  (Spiritual) Guidance will tell you YOUR role …. Let guidance come to you. Accept it without regret. …Track your sensations carefully. … In that space between assumptions and conclusions, something new is waiting—that is guidance.  Guidance will cause you to give up the life you had planned and replace it with the life you are meant to live. …And you will accept that without regret.  And that will surprise you. ..It is in that very surprise that you know that guidance has found you. ”

Guidance is an expansive softening, whereas compulsion is tight and compressive.  True guidance always allows free will and brings a felt sense of spaciousness.  It feels good. …There is joy in the experience of guidanceGuidance is an organic, utterly human phenomenon. It thrives in the presence of creativity and honesty. …”

“Our task is to find it (TRUE Spiritual Guidance) and surrender to it.”

She is also a very vocal ecology advocate: “We all have the capacity to attune to the spiritual forces that are convening now at the crossroads of time. A call has already gone out from the Guardians of the Earth. Can you hear it? Please, don’t let anything interfere with the reclamation of your personal guidance. This is your whole priority.”

taraapproach3While this specific TED Talk video was focused on developing the ability to listen to your higher guidance and act from that direct knowing, I guess I’m more amazed at the multitude of folks working on their own in the world—folks that I was so unaware even existed, just doing their own versions of trying to help others in some way. Evidently Dr. Mines with her TARA Approach, mixes psychology with energy work to help clients get in tune with their own bodies to first recognize and then eliminate the energetic trauma packets still affecting the client’s energy field (and physical body).

As a REIKI teacher and practitioner, I can easily relate to this approach because during REIKI sessions when I am working on someone who tells me of a particularly sore or painful area on their body and I put my hands over that area (and I don’t even have to touch them), I can sometimes feel the flavor of the emotional sensation trapped in that area (like sadness, or fear, or anger, etc.).

I can kinesthetically FEEL them because they are energetic vibrations that my emotional body recognizes, plus I may get visual images in my mind of a scene in which the client and others participated. When I ask the client what this image that I’m seeing means to them, along with explaining the accompanying emotion that I’m feeling with the scene, they suddenly know what that body pain is and who it was directed at.

Then when we work through releasing the stuck energy in that part of the client’s body/energy field, the original pain washes away like magic. It’s amazing. I’ve actually seen it happen.vortex knots

So I understand what Dr. Mines is doing even if I don’t know exactly how she’s approaching it. Trauma and shock are disharmonious energies that are tangled in the client’s energy field that disrupt the natural energy flow through the body. If that energy flow is disrupted long enough, then health problems arise.

The point of the therapy, whether with REIKI or whatever Dr. Mines is doing, is to find the problem area, acknowledge what the client’s association and connections are to that problem, and then to clear them from the client’s energy field and body. Then the body can reestablish a more harmonious energy flow which leads to better physical/emotional health.

taraclimatechangeThe other main thing Dr. Mines seems to be focused on is the ecological crisis at present and to bringing increased awareness to resolving that. To that effort I wish her the best of luck and hope that this renewed publicity of critical ecological situations can get people activated to become climate advocates themselves.

Lots of folks are doing lots of positive things in the world. Why not join them?

 

Final Mention of the Psychotherapy and Spirituality Summit

Before I start the new year of 2018, I want to wrap a few more of the speakers from the 2017 Psychotherapy & Spirituality Summit mentioned previously.dianeheller.jpg

I also found these folks very interesting:

Diane Poole Heller, PhD, who often worked with Peter Levine on attachment theories and trauma resolution—especially working on relationship trauma, was very worth hearing.

She claims that attachment template starts in utero…it is the earliest blueprint for our sense of relationship and how we “attach” to others, which in this sense is the birth mother.

Each attachment style requires a different kind of interface with the client to work through it.

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The four attachment styles are secure attachment, avoidant attachment, ambivalent attachment, and disorganized attachment.

Secure attachment:  Biologically designed in all of us. It is the ideal of what constitutes security and safety—this is the baseline of desired attachment—feeling protected and loved, playfulness, confident. Have a capacity to trust, and this is when we feel accepted for who we are. The ideal state.

Avoidant attachment: One of parents may be distant and unattached or unapproachable. When this occurs there is not as much development of the baby’s right brain–the child seems to be living in an isolated bubble of existence.  The child becomes more independent and reliant on self rather than others because s/he had to be this way to survive. As adults, the person tends to dismiss relationships and feel more isolated in life—became more ambivalent toward others. Couldn’t relax into love because they were waiting for the rug to be pulled out from under them—hyper-alertness. As an adult they tend to avoid disappointment that felt inevitable in a relationship–so they avoid relationships.hellerblurb.jpg

Ambivalent attachment is being too focused on others. Too dependent on others for sense of well-being and acceptance–too clingy–too needy–feeling too weak to make it alone.

Disorganized attachment: This style is the result of parents who do “paradoxical injunction” with the child—the “Come here! No, go away!” “I love you—I can’t stand you.”  “You are so good. You are so bad.”  The child may be in a double-bind of never being able to please the parent or to know which behavior is the correct one that is rewarded rather than punished because rewards and punishments are confused to the point of not knowing if intimacy is a good thing or a bad thing. Is it pleasant or painful? Or is it both?

Heller cites a collaborative treatment method for trauma therapy that involves healing attachment issues, using Levine’s somatic trauma resolution, the Diamond approach of psychology mixed with spiritual inquiry, and the New Autonomic NS Understanding by Steven Porge, along with the latest innovations in neuroscience.

***

grof6.jpgThe one other presenter I will mention from that summit is Stanislov Grof who still is one of the most influential transpersonal realm explorers of the last 40 years. The transpersonal realms deal with ordinary and non-ordinary states of reality.

Stan Grof is far too important to contain in a paragraph or two here, but he is one of the main psychiatrists who explored the alternate reality experiences of LSD, shamanic trance, Kundalini activation, Near-death experiences, possessions states, channeling other spirits, etc.

At the end of the 20th century he helped to give those extra-sensory experiences a sense of legitimacy and professional acknowledgment. The bonafide mystical experience was his holy grail of inquiry and exploration. He made it a mainstream exploration for psychiatrists.grofquote2.jpg

Holotropic states of consciousness became his life’s work, and he and his wife Christina, created the “holotropic breath work” treatment to substitute for the psychedelic drugs of mescaline, LSD, or ayahuasca experience.

He still offers training in some of those techniques and provides great historical research into non-ordinary reality.

Thanks again Sounds True for allowing me to listen to these presenters for free!

Second Part on Pat Ogden, PhD from the S & P Summit

I wanted to complete this Pat Ogden review before more “info” comes through that I feel compelled to share. As mentioned in my earlier review of the summit itself, one of the patogden 5.jpgthings I liked most about some of these spiritual psychotherapy approaches was the more collaborative methods of therapy between client and therapist.  Pat Ogden was a main example of that.

Her stated belief was that you must trust your client’s inner wisdom (which the client may not be overtly aware of) to desire to heal non-harmonious aspects of themselves, so there is no need to push or force change with the client. You simply allow what needs to change to unveil itself as you work together. But you need to create a safe-haven (a safe and comfortable environment) for the work to unfold.

She believed in the principles of mindfulness and presence, meaning that mindfulness is an actual state of consciousness—where the observer and the observed are united within that state of mind; while presence is a state of beingness.

Being mindful is the ability to focus awareness within and outside the person all at same time, which is desirable at times, but it actually prevents you from being fully present in the body.  Mindfulness may be more the out-of-body experience while being present, is being well-grounded and right here, right now.

traumainterventions.jpgOgden’s work is a unity-focused therapy of client and therapist working together for better client outcomes.  She uses language reflective of the intention of unity— lak’ech-“I am another you.”   It’s a collaborative language of “we”ness in the client’s discovery process where you give the client an option, a say in what they will do together to help the client.  Frame it for them in ways that are easy to understand, and then give them the chance to say yes or no, let’s pursue that suggested exploration or let’s wait a week or so before we do.

Her focus is on holism. Her Sensorimotor Psychotherapy goal is to harness the wisdom of the body to liberate human potential, and the body holds tremendous potential for sensoimotor psy.jpgwisdom. She simply says to honor the intelligence of the body. Watch how a client is presenting herself.  What is the body language stating that the spoken words are not? Hunched shoulders means she is holding fear….so ask about that body message you are seeing.  “Why are you sitting so scrunched together? Are you hiding within yourself or unconsciously defending yourself from something you perceive around you?…Is there something you are afraid of—something you fear about this situation or about exploring those memories? Let’s get it out and look at it. Let’s see if it truly is threatening or just seemed that way for awhile.” (paraphrased)

She says one of the greatest gifts you can ever give is helping the client discover important things about themselves—what is meaningful to them.  Her goal is to help reveal the client to themselves—it’s all about self-discovery.

Ogden avoids diagnosis of a client and especially labeling them with a disorder because they too readily identify with the diagnosis and then become it.  Her stated example was Dissociative Identity Disorder…. It may not be a good thing to call someone this. It limits them—limits how they perceive themselves.

She believes in non-violent approaches. Don’t try to force a client toward an outcome. They resist and it may not be the right outcome anyway. Try another way if possible—make it more exploratory.  A lot of this involves more “undoing” bodypatternsthan doing—unlearning old ways of thinking and being, to allow new ones to emerge.

In her practice mindfulness is a critical skill that supports our way of being, and supports the importance of presence.  When we are focused on our bodies by using our minds to assess what we are feeling in the moment, and when we examine how we are executing the actions that we take in our lives, it establishes the principle of self-engagement. These are all building blocks of the “being present” experience.

Teaching clients how to pay attention to their own bodies and to learn to recognize their own body cues is important for recognizing what the body is telling them it actually needs for optimum mental and physical health. The client might misinterpret a current situation as to whether or not it is threatening, so you look for the natural body cues as to what their body, not their mind, is saying about it?bodyleadsushome.jpg

Helping clients look for their own body-reactions in situations helps them learn what is really happening to them as opposed to what is simply being triggered by a childhood memory, etc.   How we organize our experience—those earliest patterns of inner organization—are often how we first see a situation; and it starts with how we felt about a similar situation in our childhood—like whether or not we felt helplessness or fearfulness in that similar situation.

She believes that if we go in deeply enough to the inner depths of the client, the client’s natural higher consciousness will spontaneously reorganize them toward health.  Uncovering what is emotionally hiding within the client and preventing them from realizing their wholeness allows them to self-reveal and then to self-heal.

She simply becomes a container for love for the client—holding them in acceptance and process until their health is revealed.po7.jpg

Interesting lady, Pat Ogden. Good interview.

Thanks Sounds True for this psychotherapy/spirituality summit.

Energy Shifts Now

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Lee Harris just did a John Burgos interview talking about the energy shifts that we all are experiencing now. I like his psychic intuitive aspect—it feels very harmonious with my sensing abilities.

Lee claims that manifesting your desires is a bit harder at present with these massive upgrades shifting us higher. We are changing so fast that what we create in our lives is having trouble aligning with our fast-shifting personal vibes—it’s like a focusing problem—a frequency discrepancy that is almost auto-correcting our actual needs to be more focused on the moment or being more ready for the future us that we are growing into who is less materially anchored to the old patterns of this world.headshot.jpg

He says there are greater differences in our lower and higher self now—more emotional energy in the lower of course, but the inner discord is really becoming pronounced because of the collective disharmonies and disruption. It’s time to step back and allow yourself to feel what you are feeling but recognize that the energy of that situation is a clearing of sorts for you. That energy needs release—it needs resolution—it needs to simply go because it can’t rise along with our higher-frequency selves as we raise our personal vibration to match the higher-frequency person we are becoming.

An example: For me, patience is a problem, as is tolerance of other’s behaviors that I find irritating or offensive—including my own. Lately I’m constantly trying to not-react.  My temper is tied to my ego’s importance—I do understand this and am continually pulling myself back from reactive mini explosions.  But in doing so, I know there is a caution to not stuff the anger energy as that creates resentment and festering wounds that later explode with far more devastation than the mini eruption might have originally.

Now is a time for self-observation, assessment, acknowledgment of the moment’s feelings, and release of the reactive energies that no longer serve us. And like the Dr. neural pathways.jpgJoe’s Ted Talk explanation from a couple posts ago, when you can do that you create the brain’s new neural pathways of action to move toward who you wish to be—more compassionate, more tolerant, more loving and less judgmental.

As a longtime energy worker (REIKI), I can say that stuck energies create all kinds of mental, emotional and even physical problems for people. Karmically stuck energies can last lifetimes because it attaches to your outer energy matrix which is your personal pattern of earth incarnations that provide you with the very attracting situations necessary to release that stuck karmic energy.

With hypnosis, I take clients into past-life experiences to explore the original wounds in a previous life that are creating the present life problems they are having such difficulty pastlife 6.jpgresolving, so I’m speaking from many levels of professional experience here—energy worker/hypnotist/intuitive.  I’ve personally seen it for myself—I’ve been there with the client guiding them through those situations.

First and foremost, we are beings of energy. For the earth-based experience that overall energy solidifies into a material vehicle that carries and “acts-out” this energetic pattern that defines us. At present, there is so much of our life experience as energy beings that can’t definitively be explained—much of the experience we have glimpses of but have trouble fully understanding—and some explanations we speculate on depending on our own professional focus. That’s why there are so many different treatment methods to try to help people with their various problems.

whatyouthinkis.jpgEverything in our life experience is a matter of perspective and approach—what you see—what you believe to be true—often is. That’s why I keep repeating that what you think, IS, because we create our own life experiences—we create the very tests this earth-based vehicle needs to work through our own energy issues—our own karmic debts and energy disharmonies, because we learn by doing.

The hard part is in recognizing that marvelous learning opportunity at the time, because it isn’t usually a pleasant experience when a “learning situation” explodes in our faces—especially ones that we have created for ourselves.

Yes. … (Long sigh.) …Mea culpa.