One Last Chance to Visit 3 Presenters from the “Understanding Narcissism” Summit

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Just saw the email from Tami Simons (Sounds True) on a last chance to hear Caroline Myss’s presentation that I wrote about earlier, ( https://content.soundstrue.com/understanding-narcissism-summit-encore?utm_source=bronto&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=C191116-UNS-Sell4&utm_content=Myss,+Hanson,+and+Neff+-+Free+Encore+Presentations&_bta_tid=09528543415476418810300132756200661561082200615837475413618082489837536028413298474285896175960726012765&_bta_c=azpcfyz2d505smzjcvmh15bka8yxt),  as well as two additional presenters, one of which I am reviewing here today.

This one is called “Healthy Confidence” by Rick Hanson, PhD.  Initially I didn’t understand (or appreciate) why Rick’s focus was on looking for a healthy approach to milder aspects of narcissism. So today when I listened again, I did so with the consideration that for some reason Tami and Jeffery thought that out of the 20 presenters listed, not only Caroline was offered again (which I easily 4dbb3d925440f266e9f3a71eaca87e9c.jpgunderstood), but also offered again for some reason was Rick Hanson’s presentation which to me represented the counter argument for considering mild forms of narcissism as building blocks for establishing a sense of solid self-esteem.

Then I listened more closely to what Rick was actually stressing here and he sounded very “Dr. Joe Dispenza” to me—more about healing yourself by holding the higher love-frequency emotions and using positive reinforcement to establish new patterns of brain function.  Then it made sense why he was offered as an encore. It was a positive presentation of helping others to help themselves in terms of self-worth.  Here are a few quotes:

“It’s about narcissism vs. self-worth—helping people develop (constructive) concepts of true self-worth to help those (more destructive) narcissistic tendencies fall away. Narcissists have a hollowness inside—an emptiness that they keep trying to fill with external recognition and a fair amount of self-preoccupation.  …”

He researched mother-toddler pairs and how those interactions created the solidity or lack-thereof in early childhood development.  “ …dismissive or indifferent early-childhood care-givers often created the void felt by infants that later led to excessive self-focused behaviors…”  It involved negative enforcement for undesirable infant behavior rather than a positive approach to desirable behaviors. … meaning, caregivers ignoring crying, disruptive behaviors, etc.

“It’s not abusive parental behavior, as it is simply a behavioral modification style that the parent believes is necessary and beneficial to the child and family in the long run, but which actually creates a feeling of unmet needs in the infant and child. … the child has yearnings for personal connection and love—to feel cared for and appreciated…these are normal human needs that are then met or unmet by the style of the caregiver. …

“Feelings of low worth and insecurity lead to self-preoccupation of feeling inadequate or insecure that push away the needs of other people in favor of fulfilling their own.  Overt narcissism is an endless pulling of social supplies from other people to fill that hole in the heart. …

“How do we grow healthy self-confidence? …How do we heal that old pain of never being good enough or adequate enough? … (Hungry ghost stuff). …

“Self-directed neuro-plasticity ….any kind of lasting change psychologically must be your-neurotransmitters-and-.jpgthrough lasting change physically. We become less demanding of others…we can be in relationships without making it all about ourselves. … especially create changes in the nervous system and the brain that make lasting learning… neurons that fire together wire together… help the experience leave a lasting physical experience behind to provide a memory that fuels our desirable behavior change.  …We become active agents of our own process of healing and transformation … Have the experience and enjoy it—really enjoy it—help those neurons form physical structures of brainwave patterns.  Stay with a positive experience for a few breaths to help it solidify in your brain. … somatic experiences—body sensations help us retain the benefits of the experience.  It is a rewarded feeling—we are being positively reinforced about our experience and it releases dopamine and serotonin in the brain.  Those ‘feel good’ chemicals released into our bloodstream that helps us feel good about ourselves.  …

“When we feel our worth, it represents something that we feel is true. We recognize it as a positive experience—we feel good about it. See it—feel it—internalize it. …

“Four major sources of self-worth (or self-confidence)—how you fill yourself up to feel good about yourself despite what others might think about you:

  • The 1st is to feel ‘cared about or caring’, …authentic experiences of warm-heartedness or altruistic love.index.jpg
  • 2nd is recognizing your own good qualities—natural talents, disciplined, hard-worker, perseverer, etc.
  • 3rd is experiencing and recognizing your true nature deep down—wakefulness, goodness, lovingness, Buddha-nature, childlike innocence, delight in existing, good wishes toward others, wishing to help others,
  • 4th is forgiving yourself, …self-compassion, healing shame, letting go of criticism, pardoning yourself but taking accurate responsibility for your actions and then moving forward in positive ways toward a better way of being.” ….

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Jeffery: “How does this process soften narcissistic tendencies?” 

Rick:  “I’ve seen when people do this simple receiving practice of filling themselves with love and positive experience, they feel ‘more full’ inside, it lessens their craving for unmet needs, and tames craving of needing the opinions and acceptance of others.  They feel less a sense of deficit—of something missing because that person has then learned how to self-fulfill themselves with positive feelings of true self-worth. …”  

Jeffery:  “…so you don’t have to reduce narcissistic tendencies, you simply have to build a greater sense of true self-worth?”

Rick:  “With therapeutic help and cultivating a larger shift in perspective, it helps to regulate the ‘need factor’ of how we tend to use others for fulfilling own sense of worth.”

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Okay. That is my quick-take of Rick Hanson’s presentation and his professional opinions as a practicing psychologist and a therapist, and to some degree I assume his techniques may be successful with those who have milder narcissistic tendencies, but with those who are severely narcissistic and primarily self-focused, I just can’t imagine that this treatment is truly and lastingly effective.  But again, that is just my opinion, and what do I know anyway. … 🙂

But I do agree with giving a child a healthy sense of self-worth, and in defining what the difference is between narcissism and actually creating a healthy sense of self-worth.

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To that end I could more easily agree with Dr. Kristin Neff who was also offered on the page, on the ‘difference between self-esteem and self compassion’ and the importance of standing up for oneself against a malignant narcissist.

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Overcoming the Fear of Death

When I saw this Alberto Villoldo blog-entry email ocfeardeath34.jpgon overcoming the fear of death, it triggered some memories for me of my own client situations where I became less the “curer” of the serious illness before me and became more the gentle “transition” coach for those clients—the one who helps them more peacefully transition from this life experience to the Spirit World they would soon re-enter.

As he mentions in the blog post, there were times in the two decades of my energy healing practice (REIKI, Shamanic, Hypnosis) when I was called in as a “last resort” with some new client to see if I could perform a miraculous healing and reverse their likely terminal situation.

Despite their desperate desire for reversing their dire situation, I never made miraculous-healing claims to them.  I simply acknowledged that no matter what reason initially brought that person to me, he or she was there before me for a specific need that maybe I could fill, even though it might not be for the same reason that they thought it would be.  No matter the outcome, I would do whatever I could do to help them with their current situation, and that we would face the illness together until they no longer needed or wanted me to help.

I can honestly say that I always did my very best for them—for ALL of them.  After our REIKI sessions, many, if not all, were lightened of negative/heavy energies and severe mental strain that were dragging their attitudes ever downward because REIKI has this amazing ability to simply lift their energy fields to higher frequencies, and to help them hold that wonderful sense of being at peace and feeling a greater sense of well-being. It also eased the pain that they were experiencing and often countered the extremely nasty effects of chemo or radiation.

While I worked on them, I played the most beautiful, ethereal music that I had in my collection and told them to simply relax into the music as we would soon be rising together to the highest level of healing and angelic assistance.  I even made free CD copies for them of that same music to play whenever they needed to bask in that wonderful higher ambiance—to help get them through the days until the next time we could be together to ride the higher energies again.

After only a treatment or two, no matter what process was going on with their body, jumpintospacefear54.jpgthey realized that a deep sense of peace still existed within them. And I lovingly stood by those who requested my continued presence, providing pure, higher frequency energy for them during our REIKI sessions.  While they still breathed life on earth, they could feel the eternal love and the most beautiful higher light that they knew awaited them in the next venue—and in knowing the genuine feel of deep inner peace, they did heal what could be healed within themselves and throughout their relationships while they still had the time on earth left to do so.

That is what Alberto refers to here in this article. Curing and healing are two different things—and sometimes facing our death with a calm grace and feeling deeply at peace inside is a far deeper soul healing than an illness cure can provide.

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“2019 Oct 22 —ENDINGS, TRANSITIONS, AND BEGINNINGS: OVERCOMING FEAR OF DEATH  —  Alberto Villoldo, PhD

 https://thefourwinds.com/blog/shamanism/endings-transitions-beginnings-overcoming-fear-death/  

albertoblogondeath2019.jpg“Fear of death—whether death of the body, a way of thinking, a relationship, a situation, or a dream—must be experienced fully and consciously, and then overcome for new, healthy growth to take place. We master our fear of death when we understand that our nature is transtemporal (outside of time) and undying, continuing for all eternity. …

… At just 12 years old, Annie was the youngest cancer patient I had ever worked with. Her parents had brought her to see me in the hope that One Spirit Medicine would reverse her brain cancer. They had tried every conceivable medical intervention to no avail and were looking to me for the cure they had failed to find anywhere else. Annie had lost all her hair from chemotherapy and looked like a young, smiling Buddha as she sat in a big leather chair in my office.

I explained to Annie’s parents the difference between healing and curing. While curing is the elimination of symptoms, healing works at a much deeper level, treating the causes of the imbalance that lead to disease. And while a cure is the ideal outcome of a medical intervention, healing is the product of a journey in which all aspects of your life are transformed—even if you end up dying. You carry your healed self into your next life.

…I asked Annie’s parents to sit outside in the waiting area so I could be alone with her. After a few moments of small talk, she told me bluntly, “I’m not afraid.” She went on to say that angels came to her every night in her dreams—and even during the day at times. But her parents were deathly afraid for her. “I can’t tell them about the angels,” Annie said. But she thought I would understand. And I did. I sensed that the veils between the worlds were parting for Annie and that her spirit was preparing for the great journey home. But her parents were understandably determined to do everything possible to help Annie live, and this meant trying to get rid of her cancer by taking her to a string of specialists and finally, as a last resort, to me.

I’ve been a practicing shaman long enough to understand that death is part of life. And I have seen that some of my most successful healings consisted of helping my clients die peacefully and consciously. So I performed an Illumination on Annie, to help bring balance to her energy field and thus to her body. The Illumination is the core healing practice of shamanic energy medicine, in which the luminous energy field is cleared of the imprints of disease to help mobilize the body’s own healing systems. …”

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What’s In a Name?

This post by Alberto Villoldo sums up my personalshakespearwhatisname654.jpg philosophy about ‘names’ in general or in assigning ‘the doings of our life’ descriptions to ourselves for the benefit of others who are busy trying to classify us in their own minds in some way, i.e.:  I’m a teacher….I’m a writer…I’m a helpful/not-so-helpful person…besides evidently being impatient and rude to friends, etc.  (It’s a wonder that I have any friends. 🙂 )

Yesterday sitting around the table at a group gathering, a friend was doing a lengthy explanation to the rest of us about a sudden personal revelation that she had had. It pertained to how she now ‘defined’ herself in some way—meaning, she said it defined WHO she is now, as opposed to WHO she was in the past (or at least how she saw herself from then to now).

Not being a (name) socially polite or (name) patient person myself, through all the elaborate bobbing and weaving in her lengthy story, I rudely cut in and asked, “But WHO are you?”   I mean wasn’t that the entire point of the whoamiquote234.jpgstory? Who are you now, that you weren’t two weeks ago?  Wasn’t that the most important thing for her to know that she had suddenly discovered on her life journey?

She looked a bit miffed at (name) old-rude-me, and then smilingly said that if I’d just let her finish, she would have told us who she was.  With me now properly but politely chastised, she started the story again, winding here and there, here and there, and guess what?  She never did tell us WHO she now was; instead she simply told us what she planned to do or to pursue in the near future.

Eh, ….that’s not the same thing is it? Who you are and what you do? Not to me anyway.

So this morning Alberto puts out this post about using names and identifying yourself in certain ways that tend to become self-fulfilling prophecies.  And not surprisingly, he makes my point below far better than I just did above, so I listed it here in its entirety.

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 Alberto Villoldo  (on Facebook)

I am.

These are two of the most powerful words in our language. Whatever words we place after these two words shapes our reality for the entire day, and sometimes for the rest of our lives.

The first time you experience your “I am” is when you learn your name.

For a long time, I introduced myself as “I am Alberto,” instead of saying “My name is Alberto.” I believed I was my name, which was also my grandfather’s name; it was the extension of the story of my family. What I knew about our family history revealed that we were pirates and highwaymen, with an occasional slave owner and merchant on our family tree─not much to look up to, really.

When you say, “I am <your name here>,” you rouse the spells of your ancestors. Some of these spells are about your health and how you will live and how you will die. When you go to your doctor, she asks what your parents died from. Breast cancer, heart disease, dementia─she tells you that your destiny has been cast, that it is written in your family genetics. When you go to the therapist, she shows you that the stories that run in your family leap from one generation to the next, until you become just like the mother or father you vowed you would never become.

If you live long enough, you will get to ask the question Who am I?

It is a terrible question, because it launches you on a journey into places and experiences that are unknown. You realize that you are not your name, that you are not your family, that you are not your job or any of your myriad roles in your life. That you hate Brussels sprouts and love the opera is not, I repeat not, who you are. Until you begin to transform the dream of security, you do not have the foggiest idea of who you really are.

But ask the question; this is a step in the right direction.

When my father was in his seventies he called early one morning and said to me, “Alberto, I have been living someone else’s life. I have tried to be a good husband, a good provider, a good person. But I have no idea whose life I have been living.” And for the next few years after he asked himself that question, he lived his own life until he died. I like to think that my father died at the age of five, but it was a well-lived five years.

After you spend a long time discovering that you can’t be defined by your name or by your nationality or by your gender ─ that all of these are real but not intrinsically true ─ you begin to understand that what you thought was your life and your identity was only a daydream.

You let go of the need to place something after “I am ____,” because you now recognize it is a complete statement (without filling in the blank).”

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The Mind Recognizes Patterns–Understanding PTSD

I was examining a desktop image of a jaguar lying on the river bank in a jungle setting and thinking how easy it would be in real life for the jaguar to simply slip back about five feet into that tangled jungle maze and be completely disguised by the surrounding multi-fronds of tans and various shades of green dangling throughout this natural setting.

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Seeing the jaguar then would be like one of those “Find the beach ball in this mass of balloons” puzzle that tricks the eye and challenges the intellect. While the eye might distinguish differences among the numerous lights and darks and elongated linear shapes in the picture, the mind determines the recognizable patterns within the picture frame.

To even recognize cat-shape and leopard–spots you must have seen them prior and attributed a label or a “name” to that general shape and texture so that upon seeing a simile of a “spotted-cat,” the mind immediately tries to identify it in some way to determine the jagstalkingyou45relative safety for our personal being in the situation.

While seeing a picture of a jaguar sunning on a jungle riverbank isn’t exactly hazardous to our health, seeing the real thing lying only a few feet from us might be, and the mind reacts to that possibility with a subtle or a pronounced warning signal. If you’ve ever been in a close encounter with a jaguar, even the above picture itself could trigger a spurt of adrenaline through us by preparing us for a “fight or flight” response.

How we naturally react to whatever we encounter depends on our personal history with the situation or the subject matter.

This is the problem many military personnel face when they return from fighting in war zones.  No matter where they are, no matter the actual setting around them, metaphorically they see the density of the jungle surrounding them and expectjageyealertwatching the jaguar to be lurking there ready to attack them—except the jaguar would be in human form armed with rifles and explosives, and the “jungle” could be any suspicious setting—urban or rural—where human jaguars might lie in wait for them—ready to attack.  Those who have known some form of combat can’t relax because they know “the jaguar” is always there—ready to pounce if they simply let down their guard for a moment.

This is a trick of the mind when encountering remote similarities in our lives: Our minds try to protect us by alertly recognizing patterns that might prove hazardous to our being.

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Our minds often do not differentiate between the nuances of “home” settings which should be considered safe or of “war” settings which would be considered unsafe. The mind simply recognizes any patterns of possible “enemy concealment” in our surroundings along with the uncertainty of what lies beyond the next turn in the road or the ominous new direction of the curving path before us.

Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome (PTSD) is quite real. And there should be NO stigma related to our mind simply trying to protect us from any perceived danger, even in supposedly SAFE settings (which in today’s world there seem to be fewer of).

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PTSD is our own mind simply trying to keep us alive the best way it can, because the world we have known in the past was a pretty scary place to be. 

There are many ways to help the mind retrain itself to be less reactive to what we might have once perceived as a threat.  Many therapists now employ techniques like EMDR, or Tapping, or hypnosis, or flashing light therapies, or even other techniques that I’m presently unaware of.

The therapeutic community has advanced considerably over the last decade, so if you’d like to learn a bit more about these newer therapies, I suggest these two books that I emdrmadesimplebookpersonally own: EMDR Made Simple: 4 Approaches to Using EMDR with Every Client, by Jamie Marich; and TAPPING IN: A Step-By-Step Guide to Activating Your Healing Resources Through Bilateral Stimulation, by Laurel Parnell. PhD.tappinginparnell.jpg

I wasn’t a combat vet but awhile back I had some PTSD of my own, and both books helped me to clear away the constant mental hyper-alertness and helped to uncover and release the deeply-held, hidden fears by utilizing those two techniques: EMDR and Tapping (Bilateral Stimulation).

You can give them a try just by reading the books.  Both of those books talk you through what to do. If they seem to help, you might then find a good therapist who offers one or both of those techniques to help reset your mind’s pattern recognition.

There is NO stigma attached to PTSD. It is simply the mind doing what it does naturally—trying to keep us safe from harm.

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That’s to be applauded, not condemned.

 

The Beauty of Choice

Just talked to a close friend about her recent psychic reading from a woman she had never met and who had no idea about my friend’s life, history, family, etc. Sometimes those are the most accurate readings because the person doing the reading then has no tainted feelings about it one way or the other.

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My friend’s impression of the ‘reading’ was that the lady was fairly accurate in stating some basic facts, but in others ways the woman made some erroneous ‘interpretations’ on what she might have been seeing or intuiting during the session.  (We all filter the world we see through our own biases and personal histories.  Good psychics recognize their innate tendency to judge and proselytize with a client, so they restrain themselves.  Not-so-good ones will tell you their opinions, instead of simply relaying the facts presented to them.)

One of the statements the psychic made even claimed that prior to our incarnation, we make contracts with our closest relations to come here and “act in certain ways” with each other.  She then said, “So don’t be unhappy with your (family-person) for how that person acted, and what you or she had to endure during that person’s life here because it was all preordained to play out exactly as it did.  She couldn’t have been any other way.”

To that I say BULLSHIT

We may incarnate with a set family of mutually-agreed spirits who are here to evolve and grow their own consciousness through interactions with each other, as well as through interactions with those beyond the initial family group, but HOW we individually act throughout our lives is a choice that we make every minute of every day that we breathe this earthly air. That’s what ‘free-will’ is all about. We ALL have choices in what we do and how we do it.

Every moment that we are alive involves a choice in how we respond to our surroundings and to all external stimuli; and those choices are both personally affecting to our own soul’s evolution and mutually affecting to others in our selected family groups at the same time (even affecting to the greater collective consciousness).

To live our lives daily, we ALL make choices, and each choice leads to other choices that diverge from that first choice like a tree branch growing new twigs that reach in ekrquotechoices54.jpgdifferent directions as the branch continues to grow up toward the sky. When you choose one particular branch of that tree of life to follow, you are pretty much limiting your upward growth potential to that branch’s original direction, otherwise you have to backtrack all the way down the original tree branch to the trunk base to then choose a different branch to follow because in this life, you’re not a leaping squirrel and can jump from this main branch to another main one and expect your life to simply shift for the better because of it.  It takes real work to reverse an unwise original direction.

It is possible and well worthwhile to change unwise original directions, but it won’t be easily done because we all make choices daily from early childhood onwards, and every choice leads to more choices until a general life direction is established. Then as we get older personal attitude, natural tendencies to rely on established habit, and other motivations to either face down each new challenge before us or to give up and succumb to them by numbing ourselves out with booze or pills, become the determiners of how far up that particular branch you climb.

Those are ALL CHOICES that we willingly make—that is NOT predetermination.  Period.

Yes, there are extremely difficult situations that we may have experienced in this life that might be excellent learning opportunities in disguise, BUT it takes a pretty enlightened person to view them as such. Otherwise, we simply view them as they were originally presented to us—just awful and senseless living environments that were hard for us to endure back then, and even harder to make sense of now.

But even with those previous takingchargeofmylifechoicehardships and tests of personal endurance, we still face a choice in how we respond to those memory challenges.  As a child, you might have been the unwilling recipient of your parent’s momentary or long-term instability, but as an adult who is capable of better understanding human weaknesses or frailties, you NOW have the choice in how you view those situations, and more importantly—you have the CHOICE in how you presently react to or not-react to those unpleasant memories.

Your offending parent made numerous choices in his or her life, and those choices may have adversely affected you as an impressionable and vulnerable child. While you had few choices at the time to handle those difficult childhood situations, you have many choices now to deal with the residual memories and tainted attitudes that may still haunt you.

That is the beauty of choice: Every moment presents you with a new one.

Despite what that psychic erroneously told my friend, happiness isn’t something predetermined for you prior to this life.

Happiness is a choice you make and a path that you decide to follow.

 

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Natalie Sudman’s ‘NDE in Iraq’ Video (2017)

A Paul Selig post today mentioned this Natalie Sudman video and suggested to view it, so here it is if you are interested. (NDE means “Near Death Experience.” )

As you can also see below, the photo of her at Walter Reed Hospital is with then Pres. George W. Bush.

(FYI: The interrupting ads might be annoying but the video content is informative.)

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“The Near Death Experience in Iraq That Defies Belief [FULL VIDEO]”

 

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UoEkd217lzU&t=146s&fbclid=IwAR2GgGiqWGw3E1Z78mVTGJOGxyCVeSOCAtq8fP76pGwqf9wL7EL7kT99Uyw )

UAMN TV

Published on Oct 1, 2017

Natalie Sudman had quite an unusual near-death experience in the moment when her truck hit the (IED) bomb in Iraq. She did not experience the typical out-of-body experience where she might nataliewbush42have been floating above the scene before rushing through a tunnel toward the light. Instead, Natalie simply blinked from one environment to another instantly, finding herself on a sort of stage addressing thousands of other spirits who seem to be studying her experience vicariously.

Natalie then describes a sort of download of information. She calls it a ‘transfer of information in the form of an inexplicably complex matrix’. The information included ‘events, thoughts, incidents, individuals, and groups in all their relationship complexities: stories, concepts, connections, nuances, layers, judgments, and projections. It included kinetic equations and dimensions and symbols and flows.’ or as she says later, ‘might be very broadly understood as cultural and political information’.”

Natalie Sudman quotes:

  • “Attention and intention create manifestation.” (20 minutes in) “Our thoughts create our reality.”
  • “I chose this experience—and the value inherent in this incident”
  • “We all choose our experience.”
  • (Around 43 minutes in) “Now I know that each and every consciousness makes a valuable contribution to this world and beyond—no matter how insignificant and screwed up that person might seem from within our belief structures—one person changes themselves and this world just by imagining, in this moment, a more harmonious possibility. Thank you.”

 

Live-stream Option for Dr. Joe Event

Again, just passing along the live-stream opportunity here.  Too bad it isn’t free. ($50)

As an energy worker myself, I am encouraged to see how well he explains the energy body and how our total system functions because we tend to think only of our physical body as the instigator of all our illnesses and maladies; but the energy body is the animator of our being and when those main chakra energy centers are blocked or damaged in some way, it throws our physical/mental/emotional systems into complete disarray.

I’ll list the promotion info for the event and then comment again afterwards:

Dr Joe Dispenza – OFFICIAL NEWS & FAN PAGE

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“An intentional thought needs an energizer, a catalyst— that energy is an elevated emotion. Heart and mind working together. Feelings and thoughts unified into a state of being. The quantum field doesn’t respond simply to our wishes—our emotional request. It doesn’t just respond to our aims— our thoughts. It only responds when those two are aligned or coherent— that is, when they are broadcasting the same signal. When we combined an elevated emotion with an open heart and conscious intention with clear thought, we signal the field to respond in amazing ways. The quantum field responds not to what we want; it responds to who we are being.

The quantum is the realm of infinite possibility. The only way you can experience this realm is with your awareness, and when you do, your consciousness is connecting to greater levels of frequencies and information.   Dr. Joe is giving you the opportunity of a lifetime to enter the quantum field as the collective consciousness of our community to create a new experience or new possibilities in your life.⁣⁣

You can join our upcoming live stream where Dr. Joe will be breaking down The Formula to change your life radically the live stream is taking place on July 27th at 10am pst (unlimited viewing for 30 days)  ($50 cost)  The main reason we are taking portions of our advanced retreats and turning them into a live stream format is that you, the community, have requested it.⁣⁣

Link in here to register and learn more! English, Spanish, French, German and Russian are all available https://linktr.ee/drjoedispenza

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(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1SL95sWIVJ4 )

I found this particular testimonial from his workshops was excellent in terms of how a woman worked through the energy release of healing her childhood sexual abuse.   It offers excellent explanations of the chakra energy centers releasing shame/guilt/terror energy blockages and then reopening and realigning the energy centers, and how that physically and emotionally affects us.  Joe explained it more thoroughly as she spoke including physical ramifications of blockages and reopenings.

But honestly I must say that the testimonial prior to that one did make me cringe (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IuvELXutkf0 )  with his hands-y approach to the young woman, and watching her facial discomfort with his wrapping around her from behind and his hand on her chest area (heart chakra location—heart, lungs, bronchial areas because she previously suffered from debilitating asthma).  I do think that was inappropriate and I will call him out on that.  I know what he was saying and doing energy-wise about using his own energetic heart opening behind her to encourage her heart to burst open, but still….the manner in which he demonstrated the heart-opening effect on her was highly inappropriate. And yes, that did adversely taint my opinion of his teaching techniques so we’ll see where it goes from here.

So form your own opinions on the content and benefits of what he is describing.