In Chaos Is Cosmos

Dr. Carl G. Jung noted Swiss psychiatrist/philosopher of the last century, is another one of my favorite legacy makers. I found his autobiography Memories, Dreams, Reflections moving and inspirational. He has always had a special place in shaping my personal philosophy of the world and all of us existing within it.

His theories of archetypes and the collective unconscious are still widely considered valid today. During his own psychiatric practice, he feuded with Freud’s approach while he hid his own natural psychic abilities until the release of the memoir above near the end of his life.

This post came through this morning by another fan of his and a Facebook site that I follow, so I’ll just list it here in its entirety and let it speak for itself.

***

Tao & Zen

In All Chaos There is a Cosmos – Carl Jung

jungchaosandcosmos23.jpg

In all chaos there is a cosmos, in all disorder a secret order. Every civilized human being, whatever his conscious development, is still an archaic man at the deeper levels of his psyche. Just as the human body connects us with the mammals and displays numerous relics of earlier evolutionary stages going back to even the reptilian age, so the human psyche is likewise a product of evolution which, when followed up to its origins, show countless archaic traits.

A more or less superficial layer of the unconscious is undoubtedly personal. I call it the “personal unconscious.” But this personal layer rests upon a deeper layer, which does not derive from personal experience and is not a personal acquisition but is inborn. This deeper layer I call the “collective unconscious”. I have chosen the term “collective” because this part of the unconscious is not individual but universal; in contrast to the personal psyche, it has contents and modes of behaviour that are more or less the same everywhere and in all individuals.

The great decisions of human life have as a rule far more to do with the instincts and other mysterious unconscious factors than with conscious will and well-meaning reasonableness. The shoe that fits one person pinches another; there is no recipe for living that suits all cases. Each of us carries his own life-form—an indeterminable form which cannot be superseded by any other.

We are living in what the Greeks called the right time for a “metamorphosis of the gods,” i.e. of the fundamental principles and symbols. This peculiarity of our time, which is certainly not of our conscious choosing, is the expression of the unconscious man within us who is changing. Coming generations will have to take account of this momentous transformation if humanity is not to destroy itself through the might of its own technology and science.

My interests drew me in different directions. On the one hand I was powerfully attracted by science, with its truths based on facts; on the other hand I was fascinated by everything to do with comparative religion… In science I missed the factor of meaning; and in religion, that of empiricism.

Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to an understanding of ourselves… We should not pretend to understand the world only by the intellect; we apprehend it just as much by feeling. Therefore, the judgment of the intellect is, at best, only the half of truth, and must, if it be honest, also come to an understanding of its inadequacy.

Motherlove… is one of the most moving and unforgettable memories of our lives, the mysterious root of all growth and change; the love that means homecoming, shelter, and the long silence from which everything begins and in which everything ends. Intimately known and yet strange like Nature, lovingly tender and yet cruel like fate, joyous and untiring giver of life-mater dolorosa and mute implacable portal that closes upon the dead.

Mother is motherlove, my experience and my secret. Why risk saying too much, too much that is false and inadequate and beside the point, about that human being who was our mother, the accidental carrier of that great experience which includes herself and myself and all mankind, and indeed the whole of created nature, the experience of life whose children we are?

The grasping of the whole is obviously the aim of science… but it is a goal that necessarily lies very far off because science, whenever possible, proceeds experimentally and in all cases statistically. Experiment, however, consists in asking a definite question which excludes as far as possible anything disturbing and irrelevant. It makes conditions, imposes them on Nature, and in this way forces her to give an answer to a question devised by man. She is prevented from answering out of the fullness of her possibilities since these possibilities are restricted as far as practaible.

For this purpose there is created in the laboratory a situation which is artificially restricted to the question which compels Nature to give an unequivocal answer. The workings of Nature in her unrestricted wholeness are completely excluded. If we want to know what these workings are, we need a method of inquiry which imposes the fewest possible conditions, or if possible no conditions at all, and then leave Nature to answer out of her fullness.”         ~Carl Jung~

Source: Wikiquotes

Earth as Incubator for the Soul

Just wanted to mention a well-researched article recently posted by Jean-Jacques Montagnier (http://gypsycafe.org/) that begins a three-part examination of the energies of this time period, their purposeful function, and how they relate to the ancient predictions of the Mayan Calendar and to the Vedic Energy Cycles.

He asks these enigmatic questions: “Why have some societies become so polarized? Should we not have moved into global harmony after 2012? Does polarisation have any purpose? Why is the polarisation so extreme? How long will it last? How well are we handling it? Are humans capable of living in harmony at all? How can we deal with major world problems during all this polarization?”

Dark Are the Days, but the Light Is Coming, Part 1 – An Incubator for the Soul

In this 3-Part series we are exploring the purpose of polarity and the nature of truth – JJMAn-Incubator-for-the-Soul-Diana-Graham-Hogsback-South-Africa-JJ-Montagnier-gypsycafe.org-.jpg

(http://gypsycafe.org/2019/07/18/dark-are-the-days-but-the-light-is-coming-part-1/ )

***

“Dark are the Days, but The Light is Coming – Parts 2 & 3 (+4)

In the next chapters we will continue to take a deep dive into how polarity facilitates human development and growth; we will consider how we as individuals can find our purpose and maintain balance within our polarised times; we will contemplate the nature of truth in a ‘post-truth’ world and we will consider how we can get get ready for the (future) incoming light of truth. Please subscribe to receive alerts for updates.

By J.J. Montagnier*”

*”J.J. Montagnier is a futurologist and travelosopher based in South America. His writings on the Mayan calendars are intuitively inspired and are influenced by his knowledge of Jungian psychology. The author visited Central America in 2015 to do research on the subject.”

The Stranger-Than-We-Can-Think Universe

strangerthanwethink.jpg

I’m pretty sure I came into this world with a big question mark on my forehead; and you can view that in every possible way because over the years I’ve probably considered most of them as well.

But foremost in my own search for answers to my deepest and most pressing life questions are the “how things work” and “Why are they intended to function in the manner that they do?” issues.

To me there is ample evidence that we live in a purposeful universe. We may not understand those purposes behind much of what we see around us, but there seems to be a logic of sorts—an intention, if you will, behind the structure of what we call physical reality and the interacting forces/components that create it.

I think it was one of my personal heroes, Buckminster Fuller, who said something to the effect that ‘geometry was the language of creation.’   If you as a reader want a mental challenge, read his two volumes of Synergetics (Book 1 and 2): Explorations in the Geometry of Thinking’.  I won’t pretend that I fully understood them but I did get the basic idea behind them—life is designed—nature is an intentional creation, but the questions of why, by whom and for whom are still unknown.

Buckminster Fuller was such a prolific thinker and articulator of the complexities of reality:

“Up to the Twentieth Century, reality was everything humans could touch, smell, see, and hear. Since the initial publication of the chart of the electromagnetic spectrum, humans have learned that what they can touch, smell, see, and hear is less than one-millionth of reality. Ninety-nine percent of all that is going to affect our tomorrows is being developed by humans using instruments and working in ranges of reality that are nonhumanly sensible.”   [R. Buckminster Fuller on Education (University of zodiacman.jpgMassachusetts Press, 1979), p. 130]

Or maybe we could consider another of my favorites, C.G. Jung’s thoughts on reality:

Jung: “The underlying, primary psychic reality is so inconceivably complex that it can be grasped only at the farthest reach of intuition, and then but very dimly. That is why it needs symbols.” – Carl Jung

So while much of what I write refers to relatable subjects that affect us in somewhat comprehensible ways, there is still much that also daily affects us that we are unable to grasp even the concepts of, let alone the significance of those affectations.

EintsteinQuestionEverything.pngAnd from Albert Einstein came the importance of stating those questions themselves:  “ If I had an hour to solve a problem and my life depended on the solution, I would spend the first 55 minutes determining the proper question to ask, for once I know the proper question, I could solve the problem in less than five minutes.”    [Albert Einstein, (1879 – 1955) Physicist & Nobel Laureate How to Define a Problem]

The world we think that we know is an intricate place that is likely beyond our present ability to understand the interconnectivity and true complexities of it.  But that doesn’t stop us from trying to do so in our own ways.

This blog is about mine.