The Stranger-Than-We-Can-Think Universe

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I’m pretty sure I came into this world with a big question mark on my forehead; and you can view that in every possible way because over the years I’ve probably considered most of them as well.

But foremost in my own search for answers to my deepest and most pressing life questions are the “how things work” and” Why are they intended to function in the manner that they do?” issues.

To me there is ample evidence that we live in a purposeful universe. We may not understand those purposes behind much of what we see around us, but there seems to be a logic of sorts—an intention, if you will, behind the structure of what we call physical reality and the interacting forces/components that create it.

I think it was one of my personal heroes, Buckminster Fuller, who said something to the effect that ‘geometry was the language of creation.’   If you as a reader want a mental challenge, read his two volumes of Synergetics (Book 1 and 2): Explorations in the Geometry of Thinking’.  I won’t pretend that I fully understood them but I did get the basic idea behind them—life is designed—nature is an intentional creation, but the questions of why, by whom and for whom are still unknown.

Buckminster Fuller was such a prolific thinker and articulator of the complexities of reality:

“Up to the Twentieth Century, reality was everything humans could touch, smell, see, and hear. Since the initial publication of the chart of the electromagnetic spectrum, humans have learned that what they can touch, smell, see, and hear is less than one-millionth of reality. Ninety-nine percent of all that is going to affect our tomorrows is being developed by humans using instruments and working in ranges of reality that are nonhumanly sensible.”   [R. Buckminster Fuller on Education (University of zodiacman.jpgMassachusetts Press, 1979), p. 130]

Or maybe we could consider another of my favorites, C.G. Jung’s thoughts on reality:

Jung: “The underlying, primary psychic reality is so inconceivably complex that it can be grasped only at the farthest reach of intuition, and then but very dimly. That is why it needs symbols.” – Carl Jung

So while much of what I write refers to relatable subjects that affect us in somewhat comprehensible ways, there is still much that also daily affects us that we are unable to grasp even the concepts of, let alone the significance of those affectations.

EintsteinQuestionEverything.pngAnd from Albert Einstein came the importance of stating those questions themselves:  “ If I had an hour to solve a problem and my life depended on the solution, I would spend the first 55 minutes determining the proper question to ask, for once I know the proper question, I could solve the problem in less than five minutes.”    [Albert Einstein, (1879 – 1955) Physicist & Nobel Laureate How to Define a Problem]

The world we think that we know is an intricate place that is likely beyond our present ability to understand the interconnectivity and true complexities of it.  But that doesn’t stop us from trying to do so in our own ways.

This blog is about mine.

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