Beingness

Not sure that I can do this subject justice, but I do have some thoughts on it.

Feeling a sense of higher-purpose for living and imagining a future that draws you eagerly toward it are aspirations that we all share.

Some folks might even be certain that acquiring a good education and having strong career ambitions are one and the same as living purposefully and maintaining an optimistic outlook on future endeavors.

From my point of view now from having done both with education quote from Tolleand career, I know they are not the same as living purposefully and being excited about tomorrow’s unfolding.

I also know now that my present state of beingness is every bit as valid and important to my personal/spiritual evolution as any of the doings that I’ve done in my past, if not more so. Some recent reading material substantiates that belief.

There are two books that I’m slowly wading through, and both are like eating a 5-pound hamburger…you can only get through it by taking one bite at a time and allowing for digestion to do its thing.

One book is Eckhardt Tolle’s The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment; and the other is Dr. David power of nowR. Hawkins’ The EYE of the I, from Which Nothing Is Hidden.

Both authors are said to have achieved enlightenment or what we could refer to as an “enlightened state of consciousness.” And both describe what they experienced and intuited/learned through the mind-expanding experience and the subsequent mind-state following the initial ALL-ness connection.

I’ve certainly invested a lot of pencil-lead in both books; and essentially both say the same thing: It isn’t all the doingness that clears your path to wisdom and unity consciousness (which also equates to success and happiness for spiritual seekers).

It is the beingness—the allowing yourself to simply reconnect to the massive source of energy from which you came—the Source that provides all the answers you desire to every question you could ever conceive.

In other words, the path to enlightenment is NOT a doing path. It is a being path.

The doings that occupy so much of our precious lifetime are simply distractions from finding our true life-purpose and basking in that deep sense of inner happiness. No doubt you can learn a lot from doings, but only being takes you where you truly desire to reach for that sense of inner peace.

eye of II would provide a few appropriate quotes from each to substantiate this point, but Tolle’s entire book is on that very subject of the importance of simply Being; and Hawkins has some great quotes but focuses on tying all awareness into light frequencies and calibrating the consciousness levels between the general masses and the great avatars/teachers who reached that state of extreme expanded awareness. It’s a “numbers” thing with him.

Muscle testing for Hawkins was equivalent to finding the Holy Grail, and is the standard that he used to calibrate all acquired knowledge.5 lb burger challenge

Well, as I mentioned earlier, …lots of reading left to do in both books and I won’t be hungry for some time until after I’ve finished this 5-pound burger on my plate.

CSV or What Makes Real Character?

I ran across this list on Facebook and because these individual character traits are all subjects that I love to explore in my blog, I thought I’d just put the entire list on here with reference to where you can find additional information about this movement toward creating a better life for everyone and how to “grow” a better person to live that life. There are two key points I want to make on this posting before I simply provide the info that I found below:

1) This is a major change in any standard psychologist’s perspective: from what is wrong with you to what is right with you. It is called Positive Psychology. And…

2) by focusing on how to develop and “grow” those positive human traits defined below, it can actually help people live happier and more fulfilling lives.

csv handbook“CSV is based on the book Character Strengths and Virtues by Christopher Peterson and Martin Seligman (2004), and is an attempt to present a measure of humanist ideals of virtue in an empirical, rigorously scientific manner.

In the same way that the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders is used to assess and facilitate research on mental disorders, CSV is intended to provide a theoretical framework to assist in developing practical applications for positive psychology.[1] [quote taken from Wikipedia.]

“VIA Description of 24 Character Strengths for living a happy and fulfilling Life: VIA website     (VIA means “Value In Action”.)

http://www.viacharacter.org/www/Character-Strengths#nav )

Strengths of Wisdom and Knowledge: Cognitive strengths that entail the acquisition and skillful use of knowledge.
1. Creativity & Imagination [originality, ingenuity]: Thinking of novel and productive ways to conceptualize and do things.
2. Curiosity [interest, novelty-seeking, openness to experience]: Taking an interest in ongoing experience for its own sake; exploring and discovering.
3. Open-mindedness [holistic judgment, critical thinking]: Thinking things through and examining them from all sides; weighing all evidence fairly.
4. Love of learning: Mastering new skills, topics, and bodies of knowledge, whether on one’s own or formally.
5. Holistic perspective [wisdom]: Being able to provide wise counsel to others; having ways of looking at the world that make sense to oneself and to other people.

Strengths of Courage: Emotional strengths that involve the exercise of will to accomplish goals in the face of opposition, external and internal.good character traits
6. Bravery [valor]: Not shrinking from threat, challenge, difficulty, or pain; acting on convictions even if unpopular.
7. Persistence [perseverance, industriousness]: Finishing what one starts; persisting in a course of action in spite of obstacles.
8. Integrity [authenticity, honesty]: Presenting oneself in a genuine way; taking responsibility for one’s feeling and actions.
9. Vitality [zest, enthusiasm, vigor, energy]: Approaching life with optimism and energy; feeling alive and motivated.

Strengths of Humanity: interpersonal strengths that involve supporting and befriending others.
flute playing boy with waterbuffalo10. Love & Compassion: Valuing close relations with others, in particular those in which sharing and caring are reciprocated. Empathic connections with all beings.
11. Kindness [generosity, nurturance, care, compassion, altruistic love, “niceness”]: Doing favors and good deeds for others.
12. Social intelligence [emotional intelligence, personal intelligence]: Being aware of the motives and feelings of other people and oneself.

Strengths of Justice:  strengths that underlie healthy and harmonious community life.
13. Citizenship [social responsibility, loyalty, teamwork]: Working well as a member of a group or team; being loyal to the group.
14. Fairness: Treating all people the same according to notions of fairness and justice; not letting personal feelings bias decisions about others.
15. Leadership: Encouraging a group of which one is a member to get things done and at the same maintain time good relations within the group.

Strengths of Temperance: strengths that protect against unhealthy excess and egotism.
16. Forgiveness and mercy: Forgiving those who have done wrong; accepting the shortcomings of others; giving people a second chance; not being vengeful.CSV book
17. Humility / Modesty: Letting one’s accomplishments speak for themselves; not regarding oneself as more special than one is.
18. Prudence: Being careful about one’s choices; not taking undue risks; not saying or doing things that might later be regretted.
19. Self-regulation [self-control]: Regulating what one feels and does; being disciplined; controlling one’s appetites and emotions (equanimity).

Strengths of Transcendence: strengths that forge connections to the larger universe and provide meaning in life.
20. Appreciation of beauty and excellence [awe, wonder, elevation]: Appreciating beauty, excellence, and/or skilled performance in various domains of life.
21. Gratitude: Being aware of and thankful of the good things that happen; taking time to express thanks.
22Being Happy. Hope [optimism, future-mindedness, future orientation]: Expecting the best in the future and working to achieve it.
23. Humor [playfulness]: Liking to laugh and tease; bringing smiles to other people; seeing the light side.
24. Spirituality [religiousness, faith, purpose]: Having coherent beliefs about the higher purpose, the meaning of life, and the meaning of the universe.”

What are your thoughts on the focus of Positive Psychology and these categories and definitions established at VIA?